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Why Did JamesII lose his throne in 1688?

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Why Did James II lose his throne in 1688? James II lost his throne in 1688. He did try to fight for it in 1689, but was defeated at the Battle of Boyne due to lack of support and outnumberment. Why did James II lose his throne - why did nobody support him? The aim of this essay is to find out the reasons why. One of the main reasons was the fact that most of parliament turned against him. This was because parliament was jealous of James' power. James had a standing army at his disposal and could raise money when he wanted to. The King could make courts to deal with religious issues and could suspend any law that he wanted - he could overrule a statue made by parliament. ...read more.


James had never accepted that Parliament was the ultimate authority in England. Another reason might have been the unpopularity of his ancestors. Charles I was executed and Charles II had been very unpopular. Charles II - James' brother had broken a large amount of laws and had sworn to make England Catholic (Treaty of Dover.) Charles had ruled without parliament and had almost created a second civil war. James was like his brother in many ways, so people must have disliked him as they had disliked Charles. The most important reason was religion. In those times religion brought people together. It was very important. James, being stubborn and Catholic wanted to carry out his brother's promise of the 1670 Treaty of Dover. He decided that he would use the help of the French to make England Catholic. ...read more.


In conclusion, James II lost his throne due to lack of support. Parliament now had a large amount of power and opposing them was very difficult. He was na�ve and his own brother Charles had said that he would not rule for long. "Nineteen out of Twenty" people supported William of Orange. His religion meant that hardly any of the people of England supported him and that his army deserted him. James lost his throne to a number of reasons - any one of which could not have made him lose it. For example, even if most of the people of England were against him with Parliament on his side and enough money he could have overcome anyone who disagreed with his religion. However, he made himself so unpopular that he had no support, no money, no army and no chance of keeping his throne. ...read more.

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