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Describe the types of delegated legislation and how Parliament allows delegated legislation to be made.

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Introduction

´╗┐Rachael Bennett, AS LAW, Describe the types of delegated legislation and how Parliament allows delegated legislation to be made. 10 marks. Delegated legislation is law which made my bodies of the government that are not part of Parliament, these laws are passed using the enabling act, which sets a skeleton framework imposing limits and sanctions on the law being passed in order to keep it fair. Delegated legislation enables the parliament to consider future needs of the country while having reliable knowledge in the area that the legislation is considering, delegated legislation also gives the parliament more time since they are avoiding the lengthy legislative process themselves. ...read more.

Middle

Statutory instruments are used for 3 main situations, to update, amend and vary an act of Parliament for example increasing the amount of a fine or to increase minimum wage. They are also used to bring an act into force such as the ?Railway Act of 2005? in which basic laws applying to the railways where created and passed. The last use for statutory instruments is to comply with European Union Directives. The EU has a higher power over the laws made in the UK and if the EU passes legislation the UK as a member must comply e.g. ...read more.

Conclusion

to dissolve parliament (in prep for a general election), To bring an Act of Parliament into Force, and To deal with foreign affairs (For example the ?Afghanistan Order 2001? which imposed sanctions upon trade with Afghanistan.) The last form of delegated legislation is Bye-Laws. Bye-Laws are passed by local authorities (e.g. a local council.) or national and private bodies (e.g. British Airport Association). Laws passed by these bodies either apply to a private/ national body or are applied to areas of the country by local authorities. For example the ?Dogs (Fouling of Land) Act 1996? which imposed fines to dog owners who did not pick up after their dogs. (473 WORDS) ...read more.

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