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One Dimensional Motion.

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Introduction

Lab Report 2 One Dimensional Motion By Ben Sefcik ID#2245154 Physics 200 Athabasca University Introduction Motion is everywhere: friendly and threatening, horrible and beautiful. It is fundamental to our human existence; we need motion for learning, for thinking, for growing, and for enjoying life. Like all animals, we rely on motion to get food, to survive dangers, and to reproduce; like all living beings we need motion to breathe and to digest. Motion is the most fundamental observation about nature at large. It turns out that everything, which happens in the world, is some type of motion. This lab looks at one-dimensional motion namely kinematics. This is when an object moves in relation to something else. It is the most basic of motions and a great starting point in researching motion. In looking at motion in a more scientific manner rather than just observing this lab will be taking measurements to look at relationships of distance, velocity and time. These measurements should agree with the known Galilean theories of motion. Method Part A A CBL unit was used with a motion sensor that could determine distance. The apparatus was placed on top of a table facing a long hallway with no obstructions. The CBL unit was then attached to a Ti-83 plus calculator to gather the data from the experiments. ...read more.

Middle

Figure 6 is the resulting graph from the data and table 1 has the raw data collected. Figure 6. Ball thrown in the air Table 1. Raw data collected of time and distance Time (sec) Distance (feet) Time (sec) Distance (feet) Time (sec) Distance (feet) Time (sec) Distance (feet) 0.00920 1.491 0.38922 1.448 0.78922 3.121 1.18921 6.367 0.02920 1.484 0.40922 1.448 0.80922 3.376 1.20921 6.385 0.04920 1.484 0.42923 1.440 0.82922 3.755 1.22921 6.392 0.06920 1.484 0.44923 1.444 0.84923 4.056 1.24921 6.388 0.08919 1.480 0.46922 1.440 0.86923 4.263 1.26920 6.367 0.10919 1.476 0.48922 1.440 0.88923 4.480 1.28920 6.338 0.12919 1.469 0.50922 1.440 0.90923 4.689 1.30920 6.291 0.14919 1.469 0.52922 1.444 0.92922 4.894 1.32920 6.237 0.16920 1.466 0.54922 1.444 0.94922 5.106 1.34920 6.169 0.18920 1.462 0.56922 1.448 0.96922 5.286 1.36920 6.086 0.00920 1.491 0.58922 1.469 0.98923 5.448 1.38919 5.992 0.20921 1.455 0.60922 1.448 1.00923 5.600 1.40919 5.884 0.22920 1.448 0.62922 1.444 1.02923 5.736 1.42919 5.769 0.24921 1.444 0.64923 1.437 1.04923 5.863 1.44918 5.636 0.26921 1.444 0.66923 1.469 1.06922 5.974 1.46917 5.492 0.28922 1.444 0.68923 1.671 1.08921 6.071 1.48917 5.333 0.30922 1.440 0.70923 1.905 1.10921 6.158 1.50917 5.164 0.32922 1.444 0.72923 2.175 1.12921 6.226 1.52916 4.984 0.34922 1.444 0.74923 2.478 1.14921 6.284 1.54916 4.793 0.36922 1.440 0.76923 2.802 1.16921 6.334 1.56916 4.588 Analysis As mentioned before, the results were all matched with a regression curve or line. ...read more.

Conclusion

The resulting regression produced the following equation y = -15.80X2 + 39.01X - 17.70. The units are in feet per second and will be translated into meters per second for clarification. According to the equation the gravitational pull against the ball was -9.64 m/s. This is arrived at by (-15.80 * 2) / 3.28 = -9.64 m/s. This is a little slower than the average of -9.80 m/s but it is expected because Calgary is at a higher altitude. Also, the equation states that the initial velocity of the ball was 39.01 feet / second, which translates to 11.89 m/s = 39.01 / 3.28. The initial position of the ball is listed as -17.70 feet but that would be false. The initial in reality was 1.5 feet because that is where the sensor begins to make its readings. Along the curve it is completely symmetrical, therefore at the same position on one side of the curve it has the same velocity but opposite sign than the other side. The apex of the curve occurs at 1.23 seconds (-b / 2a), which correlates to the height of the call reaching 6.37 feet above the measuring device. Conclusion The tests clearly demonstrate the Galilean theories of motion. The equations answer much as to what happened during all the tests and a better understanding of one-dimensional motion was achieved about velocity, distance and time. The final test showed that Calgary possibly has less of a gravitational pull than the average. All the tests demonstrated expected outcomes. ...read more.

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