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How does Hitchcock create and maintain suspense in the 1960's film 'Psycho'?

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Introduction

How does Hitchcock create and maintain suspense in the 1960's film 'Psycho'? Focus on the build up to the shower scene Introduction > When was it produced and who by? Psycho was produced in 1960, and made by the all-famous, all-talented Alfred Hitchcock. > Why was it a groundbreaking film? Psycho was a groundbreaking film at the time in many ways. One of the main reasons it was is because of new things included in it. As I said earlier on, this was the first time a woman has ever shown her bra on television. Some people would have been dumbfounded to see so much coverage, and it would have certainly been something to be whispered about. The same goes for the first ever toilet being flushed. Now you must be thinking why on earth would it be a shock to see a toilet being flushed? Yet when more and more things are being introduced to the film industry, people will always be interested in seeing them, as each horror movie advances in time with technology. Hitchcock also promoted it cleverly. Psycho was originally a story from a book, and Hitchcock had stopped all the bookshops from the selling the book, so that it wouldn't spoil the movie. He also made people swear not to tell others what happened, as the secrecy of it all would make people all the more anxious to see it. It was referred to as the 'mother of the modern horror movie', and was only callend this because of the taboo involved in the movie. To them, exposed flesh and toilets being flushed is modern. As well as advanced graphics and animations are modern to us. It was showing new things on screen, which were never shown before. So it became the 'mother', as it was the first movie to begin all of this. Some of these scenes were not even allowed at first, and others were even cut off, enabling this movie to be even more unexplained. ...read more.

Middle

She continued showering, but then the door behind her came into view. There was a person there, like an old lady. She looked quite humble at first, because she kept her hands together, but then the shower curtain was pulled dramatically as Marion turned around. Then she screamed, and the knife, which the murderer was holding, was held in a threatening way, and upright. We couldn't see Marion or the murderer, but only the knife cutting her body, and blood being spilt. She fell down with her back to the wall, and then slowly pulled the shower curtain, indicating her last movement. The curtain blurred our vision, creating a boundary of what should be seen, so it could have been Norman's mother or someone else. The last part of this scene was the zoom in of Marion's eye, and the shower rain still drizzling down. So it created suspense and made us anxious of whom this murderer is. Note, water was not on Marion's face entirely. There were teardrops near her eyes. So she could have been crying when being killed, or could she still be alive? Her eyes were opened when she died which is normal, but yet, we are not certain if she is dead. We would think, that she might still be alive, and want to get revenge on the killer later on. As Marion is driving in her car the rain starts to gain speed, and heaviness. As Marion struggles to see through the window of her car, fast flowing music starts to play to add more nervousness. Marion then arrives to the Bates motel. The audience then start to feel a bit edgy, because they know for a fact that this is the place where the murder is going to happen. The motel is dark and gives the damp feeling because of the rain. And it is very silent, because there are not any other people around. ...read more.

Conclusion

When she drives off, he starts to follow her. The viewer's start to feel a little in secure as well as the character, for they think she will get caught. When Marion goes to buy a new car, the policeman stops, gets out of his car, and watches. Throughout the whole scene of when she is buying the car, the viewers get the impression that somebody is constantly watching them. The viewers also feel uncomfortable, because, the dark round sunglasses that the policeman has on, makes him look soul less, almost un-human, because the audience cannot see his eyes, only when the viewers are in the eyes of Marion we can see her reflection. When Marion gets back in the car and drives off, the following continues. Alfred Hitchcock uses different camera angles to show how worried and scared Marion is. Then it starts raining which adds more tension. The viewers start to wonder if the policeman will carry on chasing Marion, or give up. The main point of the introduction to the film is too generally build up tension and suspense. Marion is driving in her car the rain starts to gain speed, and heaviness. As Marion struggles to see through the window of her car, fast flowing music starts to play to add more nervousness. Marion then arrives to the Bates motel. The audience then start to feel a bit edgy, because they know for a fact that this is the place where the murder is going to happen. The motel is dark and gives the damp feeling because of the rain. And it is very silent, because there are not any other people around. It is very deserted. Marion calls down up at the big house on the hill. This house gives the audience the impression that it is haunted, or that there is an evil presence. Because the house is up on a hill, it seems as if it were looking down at the world. Also the house is dark and gothic. These ideas make the audience start to think why the motel is isolated. It adds more anticipation. ...read more.

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