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Produce a trailer to a thriller movie, aiming at certificates for either 15's or 18's.

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Introduction

Thriller Movies Brief The task we have all been set is to produce a trailer to a thriller movie, aiming at certificates for either 15's or 18's. Anyone who chooses to aim at the 15-age limit is obviously more restricted as to the type of material they can include than someone who chose to do an 18. This is one of the many elements worth considering when producing the trailer. We have chosen to aim for the 18 certificate. Research The next step was to view previous trailers for thriller movies that have been done by either famous directors or that have been done by local sixth form students as part of their coursework. We watched classics such as Silence of the Lambs, Jaws and one of the all time favourites - Psycho. The purpose of this is to gain some insight into what works and what doesn't work when making a trailer. I managed to gain an understanding into the type of music that works as well as all the various camera angles and transitions. Watching the Jaws trailer made me realise how dramatic, eerie music can create a tension so deep that the audience physically sit on the edge of their seat. Psycho also made me appreciate how black and white film can add mood and feeling to a piece of film, as well as the importance of "mise en scene". ...read more.

Middle

Even after much persuasion, they were all still reluctant to be filmed. So instead, I asked my good friend Tom Sherwill if he and his girlfriend Nicole would play the leading roles in my thriller. It would be the same story line as planned; only Tom would be the one who walks into the kitchen to find his girlfriend dead on a table. After much thought, I also realised that this would make it a lot easier for the audience to relate to, seen as the people who I expect would watch it would be around the 18+ mark, and therefore probably involved in relationships of their own. After finally sorting out the cast, Tom, Nicole, Jeremy Creed (who is to play the stalker), and I piled into Tom's car and headed for Vazon bay, a very picturesque and tranquil beach on the west coast of Guernsey, ideal for the establishing shots. I took numerous shots of the beach and all its components, i.e. seaweed, waves and wave breakers. I then took many other shots, including ones of the couple kissing, showing their affection for each other and also shots of Jeremy's lower body with the couple in the background. I managed to gather around 15 minutes of footage, although there was still some filming to be done that had to be done at night at my house. ...read more.

Conclusion

It was a lot of fun and a very memorable experience. However, next time and indeed in future pieces, I hope to receive a little more input from members of my group. Often I felt like the workload was being left to myself, and whilst I have no objections to working hard, it seemed as if I was doing way more than my fair share of the work. However, there was an advantage to this, as it meant that my ideas played more of a part in the final piece, and that compromising with group members was not really a factor. However, this was my only complaint. I am pleased that I was unable to find a mother and daughter who didn't mind being filmed, as it eventually worked in my favour. Not only were my cast easier to work with, but also the audience are also able to relate to them more than a mother and child. But the thing that pleases me the most is my choice of music. Whilst many opted for the more obvious choice of heavy metal, I stuck with a more subtle, calmer yet more effective piece of music, which builds and builds the whole way through until all is revealed in the final death scene. I hope to work on more film projects in the future and look forwards to it with much anticipation. ...read more.

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