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Write a report explaining the principles of lighting. Explain the purpose of key, fill, black, background lights, as well as high key and low keylighting. Include lighting diagrams for two scenes from films you have worked on.

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Introduction

Write a report explaining the principles of lighting. Explain the purpose of key, fill, black, background lights, as well as high key and low keylighting. Include lighting diagrams for two scenes from films you have worked on. In this report I will be explaining the major and minor principles of lighting, the purpose of key, fill, black and background lighting along with the purpose of high and low keylighting. I will also be including detailed diagrams of two scenes from a film I have worked on. The more modern day purposes of lighting are in particular for it to create a sense of realism. Along with this modern day lighting emphasizes colour, reflection and atmosphere. In the earlier days of film it was necessary to use extreme amounts of lighting. This was because earlier film stock was not very sensitive to lighting. This meant that without very bright lighting it would not be possible to see anything which would, in effect, defeat the whole object of creating a film. ...read more.

Middle

There are problems with both ASA extremes (i.e. 10 ASA & 2000 ASA) which means that a compromise must be made somewhere in between these two film speeds. The most commonly used and more appropriate film speed is therefore around 200-300 ASA; not enough light needed to burn a lot of electricity, blind everyone and make everyone hot but not a high enough film speed to result in a grainy resolution either. Early TV was very similar to film in the way that excessive light was needed to create a picture (Baird studios 1929-1936). Even with scenes filmed outside, excessive lighting was always needed. As film and years progressed later electronic systems needed less extreme lighting but still used a considerable amount of lighting. Film and equipment has changed throughout the ages and higher film speeds have since been created to make film making more practical. Modern domestic video cameras along with professional equipment are very sensitive to lighting yet lighting is still used. ...read more.

Conclusion

The main basic lighting setup is four point lighting. Four point lighting consists of four primary movie lights; key light, fill light, back light and background light. The purposes of each light are as follows: ? Key light - The subject's main light source in the scene. ? Fill light - The light used to reduce subject shadows and contract. ? Black light - a light placed behind the subject that illuminates the back and hair, separating the subject from the background and adding additional highlights to the scene. ? Background light - a light that illuminates the background or set and, depending on it's brightness, establishes a low - or high key mood. These are some basics on lighting a scene: If the scene has two actors, set up individual key lights for each. Try to come from an angle consistent with practical lights in the location such as lamps or windows. The fill will control how much contrast the scene will have. On some occasions a fill light might not be needed. To separate actors from backgrounds and add depth, introduce backlights. ...read more.

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