• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Write a report explaining the principles of lighting. Explain the purpose of key, fill, black, background lights, as well as high key and low keylighting. Include lighting diagrams for two scenes from films you have worked on.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Write a report explaining the principles of lighting. Explain the purpose of key, fill, black, background lights, as well as high key and low keylighting. Include lighting diagrams for two scenes from films you have worked on. In this report I will be explaining the major and minor principles of lighting, the purpose of key, fill, black and background lighting along with the purpose of high and low keylighting. I will also be including detailed diagrams of two scenes from a film I have worked on. The more modern day purposes of lighting are in particular for it to create a sense of realism. Along with this modern day lighting emphasizes colour, reflection and atmosphere. In the earlier days of film it was necessary to use extreme amounts of lighting. This was because earlier film stock was not very sensitive to lighting. This meant that without very bright lighting it would not be possible to see anything which would, in effect, defeat the whole object of creating a film. ...read more.

Middle

There are problems with both ASA extremes (i.e. 10 ASA & 2000 ASA) which means that a compromise must be made somewhere in between these two film speeds. The most commonly used and more appropriate film speed is therefore around 200-300 ASA; not enough light needed to burn a lot of electricity, blind everyone and make everyone hot but not a high enough film speed to result in a grainy resolution either. Early TV was very similar to film in the way that excessive light was needed to create a picture (Baird studios 1929-1936). Even with scenes filmed outside, excessive lighting was always needed. As film and years progressed later electronic systems needed less extreme lighting but still used a considerable amount of lighting. Film and equipment has changed throughout the ages and higher film speeds have since been created to make film making more practical. Modern domestic video cameras along with professional equipment are very sensitive to lighting yet lighting is still used. ...read more.

Conclusion

The main basic lighting setup is four point lighting. Four point lighting consists of four primary movie lights; key light, fill light, back light and background light. The purposes of each light are as follows: ? Key light - The subject's main light source in the scene. ? Fill light - The light used to reduce subject shadows and contract. ? Black light - a light placed behind the subject that illuminates the back and hair, separating the subject from the background and adding additional highlights to the scene. ? Background light - a light that illuminates the background or set and, depending on it's brightness, establishes a low - or high key mood. These are some basics on lighting a scene: If the scene has two actors, set up individual key lights for each. Try to come from an angle consistent with practical lights in the location such as lamps or windows. The fill will control how much contrast the scene will have. On some occasions a fill light might not be needed. To separate actors from backgrounds and add depth, introduce backlights. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Films section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Films essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Film Studies 28 Days Later How are the mise-en-scene, lighting, performance ...

    3 star(s)

    implying connotations of Jesus on the cross, possibly implying that Jim is a saviour. Another thing I notice about the mise-en-scene is that Jim is tied in with intravenous tubes, and has a scar, exactly where the previous monkey had his electrodes tied in.

  2. My task is to study in detail a minimum of 3 scenes from the ...

    When Zhora is within shooting range, the camera zooms out statically. There is a long shot when Deckard is aiming to shoot. When the gun is shot and Zhora is hit the scene goes into slow motion. As Zhora falls through the glass with her transparent coat flowing behind her literary allusion is used.

  1. Production Report

    I then went on to use this in my production. When I was thinking of a storyline for my thriller movie, I had to think of who were the target audience that I was aiming at. The targeting audience's age range was 15+, meaning that the certificate for my thriller would have been a 15 or 18 certificates.

  2. Comparing Tim Blake Nelson's Version of Othello to That of Geoffrey Sax

    This technique was brilliant and truly commendable. Like Nelson, Sax uses the camera to portray the loss of rationality on John's part. When Desi leaves in rage and confusion, John searches her room for signs of her unfaithfulness. Camera shots are chaotic and turning in every direction, including 360� turns, showing us John's disorientation and his loss of rational.

  1. Compare 2 posters for films of different genres. Comparing: 'The Skeleton Key' and 'Dungeons ...

    in her hands which indicate that she is ready for something and knows that something is coming ahead (behind the key hole). There are no other racial backgrounds shown on the poster other than white. In 'Dungeons and Dragons' poster there is seven main actors.

  2. Looking at two films studies, compare and contrast their representation of the future (Planet ...

    When these are broken down, comparisons that are more literal can be made, not just between the visions of the future but between the technical aspects of the film and why these are relevant. For example, we, the audience, can look at the type of shots the director's used and why.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work