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Political Ideologies - Socialism.

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Introduction

Political Ideologies: Socialism Andrew Haywood Collectivism The belief is that the collective human endeavor is better in practical terms and on a moral basis than individualism and self-striving. This pushes forward an idea that humans are socially adhering creatures and that any group is good as a political entity. Thus, groups often mentioned in political contexts like 'class', 'race' and 'nation' are applicable to this concept. This term has been applied to several viewpoints and inconsistently due to the difference between the theories of which it has been applied. Some Anarchists apply collectivism to groups of associated individuals that govern themselves. Further away from this; some throw out any 'individuality' concept, and one can see how Collectivism might apply to this. The collective interest prevailing over the individual. This in other words is the many over the few. ...read more.

Middle

These socialists saw that the state in an effort to act in the favour of capital and negated the needs of the Labour. Thus, people like Marx said that revolution was unavoidable to instate Socialism. The context of these theories was unsettled with many discontent in the lower classes during the 19th century. Lenin saw Parliamentary democracy in an even dimmer light and called it a fa´┐Żade 'concealing the reality of class rule'. The view that the system was against the bourgeoisie was also supported by the fact 'concealing the reality of class rule'. The view that the system was against the bourgeoisie was also supported by the fact that all personnel of state came from a privileged social background. Evolutionary Socialism proposed a peaceful change as the working class lost the revolutionary urge amidst being integrated into society. ...read more.

Conclusion

Gradualism Gradualism was a belief that reform would come about inevitably; that Socialism would prevail with its presence in the diplomatic system. The Fabians saw Socialism as a definite result. This idea was founded upon the changes and prophesized changes of the democratic state allowing an avenue for Socialism to naturally prevail. Equality A fundamental value in which social cohesion and fraternity was a basis for the development of justice or equity. Although there was a shift towards liberal ideas, the socialist way ensured a more complete freedom in its theories. Ethical socialism Social democracy in the 20th C. is based upon a religious argument rather than on a scientific one. The latter was used by Marx, he saw he ideas as simply revealing the laws of social and historical development; with socialism as an inevitable outcome. Social democrats aimed to improve the moral concepts of capitalism towards the superior socialist values. Christianity was big in influencing it with concepts of brotherhood. ...read more.

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