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World Bipolarity

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Introduction

WHAT WERE THE IMPLICATIONS OF BIPOLARITY FOR GLOBAL ORDER? (20 marks) Bipolarity, in International Relations, describes the distribution of power where two states dominate the region with economic, military and cultural influence. In most cases not only is this regionally, but also internationally. One such example would be the Cold War era between the United States and the USSR from just after World War 2 to just after the first gulf war. The two states were the leading superpowers at the time both excelling in economic and military might whilst the rest of the world was occupied with rebuilding and reshaping their economy. But this is where the similarities ended. The world split into two significantly different ideological factions, capitalism and communism. ...read more.

Middle

That is not to say however, that we came perilously close to being thrown back into another World War. The Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962 was a key period where the world found itself on the brink of an all out nuclear war. With the USSR being exposed using Cuba as a missile base; the USA feeling under threat and fearing use retaliated by secretly launching missile bases in Turkey. They even had satellite states which they used to carry out their star wars on strategic limitation talks. The USA and the USSR were not the only ones affected, but also the countries within the sphere of influence of each, as the Korean Civil War of the 1950s shows. ...read more.

Conclusion

As a result, the world split into a bipolar system and the world had no choice but to place itself in one sphere of influence or the other. In conclusion, the USSR eventually lost in 1990 and the USA prevailed through the "war" which meant that capitalism had therefore the upper hand throughout the rest of the world. The implications of this have been immense. The ideology has taken over all the major markets in the world, and countries are increasingly transitioning from communism to capitalism and also adjusted the standard of living and lifestyle in the assimilation of the USA. Aside from this, the implications of bipolarity in international relations have been numerous. One such being the development of nuclear weapons increasing immensely with several countries today either possessing or developing nuclear weapons. ?? ?? ?? ?? Abdullah Jafar Chowdhury 31 October 2008 ...read more.

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