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Consider the contribution creative development may make to the education of young children, illustrating your discussion with explicit examples

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Introduction

' A critical analysis of creative development placement based tasks.' Consider the contribution creative development may make to the education of young children, illustrating your discussion with explicit examples of an activity/activities you planned in nursery and making clear reference to the Early Learning Goals. Critically analyse at least one activity giving attention to content, organisation, your role, the appropriateness of the activity and the quality of children's experience in relation to your planned intentions. You should make clear and explicit reference to the response of at least one child if possible, identifying targets for their future needs. Contents Essay p 2-6 Bibliography p7 According to HMI (DES 1985:17, cited in Rodger 1999, p. 128) creative development is concerned with, " the capacity to respond emotionally and intellectually to sensory experience: the awareness of degrees of quality; and the appreciation of beauty and fitness for purpose." Creativity allows children and adults to express ideas and feelings in a personal and unique way. Although being creative can be seen as a uniquely human characteristic, if children are to develop their abilities in this area they must be provided with the opportunities that allow them to explore and experiment helping them to gain confidence to express their ideas in a way which is uniquely their own. This is facilitated in the nursery classroom where a rich and stimulating environment is provided helping children to generate and develop their creative ideas supported by sensitive and responsive adults. ...read more.

Middle

Another child had remembered what the monster looked like from the story 'Not Now, Bernard' and instead of using the primary colours that had been put out he mixed the colour purple independently from memory. Other children were very imaginative and painted very individual paintings. They were able to describe what their monster looked like as well as what type of monster it was, for example, scary, naughty, this describing meant that the activity involved another area of learning, Communication, Language and Literacy. The activity went well and most children were able to meet the lesson objectives. All children were able to practice their painting skills, most children used their own ideas to create a painting of a monster whilst others painted monsters from memory, both of which help to develop children's learning. Some children found describing their painting/monster difficult as they did not have the relevant language skills, but when asked questions about their paintings they were able to answer well. Individual targets were set but all the children need more opportunities to paint using their own imagination and ideas. The way the activity was organised meant that the task could be introduced and explained to the children as a whole class. Then having three children at a time the activity could be controlled and supervised well, giving the children opportunity for one to one help and guidance if needed. ...read more.

Conclusion

Whilst I was on my placement a child who really enjoyed the creative aspect of learning, who was still at the scribbling stage, worked extremely hard on a piece of work and was continually praised throughout the day. As her confidence grew, due to being praised for her artwork, her confidence and interest in other areas of learning grew. Children are able to develop and assess their own and others ideas, and choose what materials tools would best fit a job/task. Children are able to build up knowledge about the world around them through their senses by trial and error in art, using their own ideas and methods what ever their abilities/needs. Overall children enjoy art because it is fun, there are no rules to follow, they are free to explore, experiment, express themselves and learn by discovering things for themselves. Barnes (1987) suggested just how important art is, " To be involved in creative activity is to confront how we feel about things. Expressing a mood, emotion, or temperament through art becomes as valid as responding to another person, a moving sight, or a meaningful experience. Both responding and expressing through art puts us in touch with qualities, which are part of what make us human. As such they give special significance and meaning to what we see with our eyes and the inner of the mind. They touch on part of us that nothing else can." (p. ...read more.

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