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Describe the main theoretical models of child abuse.(

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Introduction

Protecting children. Describe the main theoretical models of child abuse.(1D) Medical model, sociological model, psychological model, feminist model and contextual model are all theories relating to abuse. Although there are many different types of child abuse and many different reasons why it may occur, most cases have been wilted down to fit into one of the five main theories named above. Medical mode is when the reason for abused is classed as a disease or an illness. Kempe and Kempe were the inspiration for this theory when they described it as battered child syndrome which was linked to Bowlby's theory on attachment. Bowlby came to the conclusion that children who failed to form this bond with their mother in the first three years of the child's life would have problems in later life bonding with people and trusting people. He also described a child with a lack of bonding to be an affectionless psychopath, which he described to be someone who shows lack of guilt when done something wrong has difficulties showing emotion to things around them or someone with behaviour problems. ...read more.

Middle

It is not always this case however, some abused children grown up with the determination to treat the children with the love and kindness that they never received themselves. The case study states that the children are living in a high rise block of flats with faulty wiring, damp, and a lack of hygiene. The children are constantly around alcohol, drugs and known criminals. This is definitely not an appropriate environment for the children to be around and this is why I feel it fits in to this area of abuse. Psychological model is based around the family and its relationship status. It involves one particular member of the family being scapegoated by the rest of the family and getting the blame for all the problems that arise in the family. This type of abuse can be linked with the case study because the older child Katie gets blamed for a lot of the things that go wrong in the flat especially linked with her brother. Her brother is only a baby and if he cries then Katie gets in to trouble. ...read more.

Conclusion

The chaotic context is when the discipline within the family is inconsistent and there is a lack of boundaries, this means the child will not know what acceptable behaviour is and what is not. This is because one day they will do something and it will be accepted by the parent/carer but another day they will do the same thing and get punished for it. Care of the children is often erratic and sometimes older children are given adult responsibility. This links with the case study as John the father has too high expectations of Katie as she is given too much responsibility with looking after the baby when she isn't really old enough to even look after herself. All in all according to the case study Katie and Shaun are suffering from all 5 of the above mentioned models of abuse. This is not a good way for children to be brought up and it is a good job that the social services are discussing the welfare of the children and hopefully they will be moved into a more child friendly setting where they will receive all the care and comfort they need. ...read more.

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This essay asks only for a description of child abuse theories - within this there is still the opportunity to give detail of knowledge and research used to inform theory. The essay gives some examples from the case study to illustrate features of theories - possibly consider writing about fewer theories with more depth of knowledge.

Marked by teacher Stephanie Porras 26/03/2013

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