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Education for citizenship is important because every society needs people to contribute effectively, in a variety of ways, to the future health and wellbeing of communities and the environment, locally, nationally and globally.

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Introduction

Rationale for citizenship Education for citizenship is important because every society needs people to contribute effectively, in a variety of ways, to the future health and wellbeing of communities and the environment, locally, nationally and globally. Fostering active and responsible citizens contributes to the process of developing a healthy and vibrant culture of democratic participation. Whilst all individuals share the rights and responsibilities of citizenship, regardless of status, knowledge or skill, it is clear that citizenship may be exercised with different degrees of effectiveness. The opportunities for learning that are provided in primary education make important contributions to the process of educating for active and responsible citizenship. At the same time, the contributions of formal education need to be seen alongside, and in interaction with, parents, carers and the media and opportunities for community-based learning. Also, primary schools need to take account of the diversity of the local communities in which young people live. Aims of the topic The rights and responsibilities of citizens are reciprocal in many respects. If we all have a right to be treated with respect, then it follows that we have a clear obligation to treat all others with respect. If we all have a right to a say on matters that affect our lives, then we have a responsibility to attend to the views of others on matters that also affect them. However, it is also clear that perceptions of rights and responsibilities by individuals in different social groups are sometimes in conflict. Education for citizenship must recognise the existence of such conflicts, and must help children develop strategies for dealing effectively with controversy. These strategies include negotiation, compromise, awareness of the impact of conflict on the overall wellbeing of the community and the environment, and development of well-informed respect for differences between people. Starkey (1992) maintains that any programme to promote values education is essentially concerned with human rights as these are internationally validated moral standards, universally accepted in principle in international discourse. ...read more.

Middle

QCA Fountain, Susan. (1990) learning together, Global Education4-7. Cheltenham: Stanley Thornes. Holden, C. (2003) Citizenship in the Primary school: Going Beyond Circle Time. Pastoral care in Education, 21 (3),24-29 Kerr, David.(1998). Citizenship education in primary schools : a national survey commissioned by the Institute for Citizenship Studies about opportunities for citizenship education and community involvement in primary schools, final report . QCA Klein, Reva . (2001) Citizens by right : citizenship education in primary schools : Stoke-on-Trent : Trentham and Save the Children. Lister, I. (1984) Teaching and learning about human rights. Strasbourg: Council of Europe. Starkey, H. (1992) Back to Basic Values: Education for justice and peace in the world, Journal of Moral Education, 21(3), 195-92 United Nations.(1989) Teaching human rights : practical activities for primary and secondary schools. New York : United Nations. Appendices Appendix 1: Declaration of children's Rights Appendix 2: resources for lesson on "wants and needs" Appendix 3: Key topics for Citizenship for Key stage2 Appendix 4: Notes on citizenship at Marlborough first & Middle school in relation to literature Appendix 5: Current citizenship Policy at Marlborough School Appendix 6: Anti bullying policy. Appendix 7: support for professional standards for QTS Appendix 4 During ATSE citizenship was taught as part of PSE and through assemblies. Circle time was the only means of delivering both PSHE and citizenship, which, incidentally was rarely carried out. Teachers often used this time to catch up for the core subjects. However, this was partly due to time pressure and the individual teachers view of citizenship. Currently there was no citizenship policy in place and the scheme (Passport) used by the school lacked the key elements of citizenship education. The golden rules, the weekly assemblies and the introduction of the school council was deemed enough by the staff to think that the school was providing effective citizenship education ( see below) Having no exposure to "good "citizenship lesson, the scheme of work unit plans provided me with the knowledge and the understanding of what was required of citizenship education. ...read more.

Conclusion

Also, because citizenship is a lifelong process, young people's learning experiences should encourage them to be disposed to be active and responsible citizens both now and later in their lives. Clearly, Marlborough is attempting to actively involve children through the introduction school council; however the interpretation of citizenship education is very limited. There are opportunities for teachers to incorporate many aspects of citizenship into their existing teaching by extending and adapting what is already taught (to overcome time restriction in the timetable). However, the school urgently requires a scheme of work for citizenship which takes into consideration of the local community and would provide clear framework and consistency across school. This then needs to be communicated to teachers as I felt some clarification was required between PSHE and citizenship, as many classes (certainly both of the years 4) were not delivering the citizenship curriculum. This is consistent with finding of David Kerrs' report (1998), where 27% of primary schools were not addressing the theme of citizenship and was the area where the greatest difficulties were being experienced by schools. Anti- Bullying Policy at Marlborough The policy is out of date, and needs revising urgently. Generally when bullying did occur (if it was name calling) then it was dealt with the class teacher, however if there was physical harm then the Head teacher dealt with. I am not aware who was involved in writing this policy; however everyone concerned with the school, these include teachers, classroom assistant, kitchen staff, dinner and playground supervisors, caretakers, parents, and the local community members should be involved for the next revised policy. This shows the school's commitment to its principles and provides a reference point for children, staff and parents. While having policies is important, they will only have validity and credibility if they are implemented. For example the golden rules- are they applicable to everyone, or is there one set for children and another for teacher and other adults? (Klien 2001). 1 ...read more.

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