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Examine a range of diverse family structures and functions in Britain today

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Introduction

Task 1: Outcome 1.1 - Examine a range of diverse family structures and functions in Britain today What is a family? A family is a group of people who are related by kinship ties: relations of blood, marriage or adoption. The family unit is one of the most important social institutions, which is found in some form in nearly all known societies. It is basic unit of social organisation and plays a key role in socialising children into the culture of their society. Hobart C 1999 'the group of people, generally related but may include friends, who are significant and important to a child'. One of the most important functions of a family is to provide for a child's needs, because children are unable to care for themselves. These needs include: food, shelter, warmth, clothing, love and companionship, protection and support, care and training, a secure environment in which they can develop into young adults. ...read more.

Middle

Extended Family - the extended family is a large family group which includes grandparents, parents, brothers, sisters, aunts, uncles and cousins. Such family is the basis for the traditional pattern of family life in many countries. When the members of an extended family are closely connected by affection, duty, common interest, or daily acquaintance, they may help and support each other in a numbers of ways such as: - Providing comfort at times of distress Helping the parents to bring up their children Looking after the children in an emergency or when parents are working Giving advice on problems Helping financially Moonie N 1995 'a family which consists of parents and their children, and other relatives such as grandparents, uncles or aunts'. Beaver M 1999 'a family grouping which, includes other family members who live either together, or very close to each other and are in frequent contact with each other. ...read more.

Conclusion

The one-parent has to do everything that is usually shared by two-parents - provide food, shelter, clothes, a sense of security, daily care and training. This is very hard work, and continues for many years until the children have grown up. One-parent families can vary as widely as two-parent families in terms of health, wealth, happiness and security. The family situation can also change with one-parent family becoming two-parent family or the other way round. Moonie N 1995 'a family consisting of one parent and children' Ethnic Minority Family - an ethnic minority family can have a structure of any of the previously noted families but are made up with individuals of a minority race. If this is an Asian family there are more likely to be a nuclear family as divorce is not accepted as commonly as it is amongst British families. As early years professionals we have to be aware of the diversity of family structures and respect them all equally. BTEC National Diploma - Early Years Unit 11: Applying Sociology - Range and diversity of family structure Laura Gillespie ...read more.

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