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Nature vs. Nurture - In this piece of coursework I aim to find out whether a person's behaviour is determined by their upbringing or by their genetic characteristics

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Introduction

Nature vs. Nurture In this piece of coursework I aim to find out whether a person's behaviour is determined by their upbringing or by their genetic characteristics. The research is important because if we were to find that the way someone is is controlled by genetic factors then changing there behaviour will be extremely difficult. On the other hand if their social background determined someone's behaviour then it could be far easier to deal with behavioural problems. This knowledge would be important to a wide range of professionals working with difficult persons (for instance psychiatrists prison officers child care workers probation officers etc). I will look at two pieces of context and create a method to find out if my hypothesis is correct. I hypothesise that the way you are nurtured (i.e. social background/upbringing) will have the greatest effect For my first piece of context I am going to use the film L'Enfant sauvage. In the film we see how a feral child is captured and then taken to Paris to be studied by a doctor Itar. ...read more.

Middle

From this I am going to dram my second concept; people with similar genetics will act in a similar way. This would mean that a group of people with red hair should act differently to people with black hair, or that some one with bulbous fingertips is more likely to kill their family. As in all scientific tests the only way to examine any one factor is when all the others remain the same. There fore possibly the best way of testing whether nurture or nature is more influential would be to take two twins and separate them from birth. Leaving one to raise itself in the wild, while the other would be brought up in a more traditional manner. At the end of this the two people could be compared to see if there were any differences. However this raises many moral issues and would prove very timely and costly. So I would not imagine this would be possible to undertake. ...read more.

Conclusion

The amount of time that it would take to undertake the research would be phenomenal. As we would need to wait an amount of time before our presence became "normal". Even after this the time when we were collecting the information from the villages would be long. Though as we would be collecting so much information on so many different aspects of there live it may take just as much time to analyse the data and present it in a way that it could be compared. The amount of time it would take would also increase the cost. The quality of the data that we will collect may be pore for several reasons. The first and most important in my opinion would be the effect that we had on the people in the village even after an amount of time. With different people acting to different people in other ways we may find our data is unreliable. The information that we collect may be of a poor quality as it would not be in a very structured manner. This will make it difficult to compare between the tribes. By antony Griffiths ...read more.

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