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Outline and evaluate research into the influence of culture on romantic relationships

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Introduction

´╗┐Outline and evaluate research into the influence of culture on romantic relationships: There are many observed cultural differences in romantic relationships. These can be attributed to the type of society individuals live in, individualistic or collectivist, both with very different ideas about how individuals should live and what their priorities should be. Such embrace different types of relationship, involuntary or voluntary, permanent or impermanent. In addition in different cultures different things are valued within relationships and they are formed, maintained and ended for different reasons. In collectivist cultures there has been much evidence to suggest many marriages are involuntary. Udry 74 stated that the traditional system for mate selection in such cultures is by arranged marriage. Qureshi (91) ...read more.

Middle

Levine et al carried out an almost identical experiment and found that participants from collectivist countries, India and Thailand 24% and 34% respectively would marry in the absence of love. In addition a study by Myers et al (2005) found participants from India viewing love in marriage as not very important. On the other hand, in individualistic countries the opposite has been found, with the majority of marriages being voluntary. The participants from individualistic countries in the studies mentioned above were much more reluctant to marry without love. For instance, in Sprecher et al?s research 89% of Americans would not marry without love and Myers et al?s US couples placed love as a higher priority than the Indian couples. Studies have also shown that cultures can influence how permanent individuals living there view marriage and relationships to be. ...read more.

Conclusion

A study by Aumer-Ryan et al (2007) highlighted differences in relationship satisfaction between individualistic and collectivist cultures. They interviewed men and women at the university of Hawaii (individualistic country) and the University of West Indies in Jamaica (collectivist country). It was found that in Hawaii men and women were most satisfied when they perceived their relationship as equitable. On the other hand, the Jamaican students were most satisfied when they perceived themselves as over benefitting. Finally, research by Moghaddam et al (93) demonstrated that collective, obligatory and permanent non western relationships are likely to be less susceptible to dissolution due to the individuals sense of obligation to others rather than pursuing their own individual desires and aspirations. ...read more.

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