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The Developmental Needs of Children.

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Introduction

The Developmental Needs of Children Middle childhood (ages of approximately 6-10 years) is a period of time when children enter the larger culture (primarily through schooling) and develop the intellectual and social skills they need to function effectively outside their family environment.1 Children spend more and more time with non-family members, including peers and teachers. They spend less time under supervision of parents, more under supervision of teachers and other adults, such as coaches, youth group leaders, or teachers. Consequently, they spend more time with peers outside the immediate influence of parents and become more concerned with social expectations of peers and adults. With increased freedom, children feel greater demands to be "good," show respect, and accommodate to social demands of situations, such as the classroom or non-familial social settings. With increasing social experience and the development of new intellectual skills, children: * Master fundamental skills considered important by culture, such as reading and arithmetic; * Develop self-awareness, such as knowing how to go about learning; * Develop skills in consciously planning, coordinating, and evaluating progress, and modifying plans, based on self-evaluation; * Develop abilities to reflect on themselves and understand that others have different points of view. ...read more.

Middle

Some of the key developmental changes occurring during adolescence include4: * The physical changes associated with puberty. * The increasing ability to think abstractly-consider the hypothetical, look at multiple dimensions of the same situation, and reflect on themselves. * More understanding of internal psychological characteristics; the development of friendships based more on perceived compatibility of personal characteristics. * Distancing of relationships with parents and family. * Importance of social acceptance, peak of peer conformity. The structure of schools (greater size, multiple teachers) may actually reduce opportunities for adolescents to form close relationships with teachers. The higher standards of judgment imposed in school and work settings may be related to decline in self-perception. Well-designed out-of-school programs and contexts can provide adolescents with experiences to counter the potentially negative impacts of school settings by providing5: * Opportunities to form secure and stable relationships with caring peers and adults. * Safe and attractive places to be with their friends. * Opportunities to develop relevant life-skills. * Opportunities to contribute to their communities. * Opportunities to feel competent by highlighting effort rather than competition. ...read more.

Conclusion

* Personal and social competence: life and leadership skills training, including conflict resolution, decision making, mentoring, preparation for parenthood, and sexual abuse prevention. * Cognitive and emotional competence: tutoring, homework clinics, communication and computer skills, opportunities to develop interests and avocations in science, technology, music and the arts. * Preparation for work: career awareness, technical training, internships, summer job placements, and paid employment in youth and community organizations. * Leadership and citizenship: community service, leadership-skills development, youth advisory boards, and civics education. 1 "The Development of Children Ages 6 to 14." Jacquelynne S. Eccles. The Future of Children: WHEN SCHOOL IS OUT. Vol. 9 (2) Fall 1999. 2 Ibid. 3 Identity, Youth, and Crisis. Erik Erikson. New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 1968. 4 Ibid. note 7. 5 Ibid. note 1. 6 "When School is Out: Challenges and Recommendations," The Future of Children: WHEN SCHOOL IS OUT, Vol. 9 (2) Fall 1999. A Matter of Time: Risk and Opportunity in the Out-of-School Hours, Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development, 1994. Nurturing Young Black Males, Ronald B. Mincy (Ed.), The Urban Institute Press, 1994. The Kindness of Strangers: Adult Mentors, Urban Youth, and the New Voluntarism, Marc Freedman, Jossey-Bass, 1993. 7 A Matter of Time: Risk and Opportunity in the Out-of-School Hours. Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development. 1994. ...read more.

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