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Why did the British government try to evacuate children from Britain's major cities in the early years of the Second World War?

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Introduction

Assignment 1: Model B: Britain in the Second World War. 1. Why did the British government try to evacuate children from Britain's major cities in the early years of the Second World War? The evacuation of children in the early years if the Second World War was a major effort by all different types of people, especially the government. In anticipation of warfare a lot of forward planning had taken place. The main reason why children were evacuated was for their own safety. The government wanted the children to escape the danger of German air raids. Soldiers would say that the children distracted them from fighting a better war. In other words, this means that the soldiers said that if the children were in the city at the time of war, they will lose the war because of them because when children begin to panic; soldiers and workers can become distracted from the war effort. Children were first evacuated in 1939. This was named by the government as "Operation Pied-Piper". The government had other priorities for the city and war which was why they had no choice but to evacuate as it would be safer for the children in the countryside. Children needed to be kept from seeing the horrors and damage of the war otherwise this could lead to physiological concerns when they got older. ...read more.

Middle

Having children in the cities was also seen as a distraction to both soldiers and parents. Soldiers were not able to fully concentrate on the enemy with children in the area and parents were not able to concentrate and put in full concentration in the war effort. 2 (a). Why do sources A to F differ in their attitudes to the evacuation of children? As part of the preparation for war, the Government decided that all schoolchildren and mothers with children under five years of age should be evacuated from the cities and sent to live in villages in the countryside that were not likely to be bombed by the Germans during the war. People had many different views and attitudes towards the evacuation of children. Sources A to F are prime examples of contrasting views. Source A shows children and their teachers being evacuated to the station in London, September 1939. This was the first wave of evacuation so the government wanted to make the evacuation process look good as they wanted to make a good impression of their organisation for parents to be reassured. Therefore I question this scene as it may have been set. If the source was for a newspaper, it could be an example of propaganda. ...read more.

Conclusion

Sources A and B link because they both show some form of organisation the government controlled in the matter of evacuation. In Source A, the children are well ordered and look calm and content. In Source B, the teacher explains that the train was ready and waiting for the children to board when they arrived at the station. Sources A and D link because they are both scenes trying to persuade people -both parents and potential foster parents that evacuation is safe and the children will cause them no trouble at all. In Source A, the children are portrayed as well behaved and calm, and in Source D, the two children are shown as sweet and innocent. Sources B and E are linked because both the people share the fear of the unknown. The teacher in Source A explains that she "hadn't the slightest idea" as to where they were going. The father in Source E explains that he won't let his son go because "they can't be looked after where they're sending them". Both the teacher and the father share the feeling of threat and misconception. In conclusion people shared mixed emotions on how they felt about evacuation. Parents looked at it either as a safe haven or a threat for their children, and children looked at it either as an adventure or a terrifying place where they knew no one or their surroundings. Danielle Choyen 11 Miranda ...read more.

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