• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Mesopotamian Art vs. Egyptian Art

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Derek Art History Paper 2 Dr. Rosenbergggg. The Sumerian word lama, which is rendered in Akkadian as lamassu, refers to a beneficient protective female deity. The corresponding male deity was called alad, in Akkadian, sedul In art they were depicted as hybrids, as winged bulls or lions with the head of a human male (Centauroid). There are still surviving figures of ��du in bas-relief and some statues in museums. They are generally attributed to the ancient Assyrians. To protect houses the shedu were engraved in clay tablets, which were buried under the door's threshold. At the entrance of palaces often placed as a pair. At the entrance of cities they were sculpted in colossal size, and placed as a pair, one at each side of the door of the city, that generally had doors in the surrounding wall, each one looking towards one of the cardinal points The Shedu is a celestial being from Mesopotamian mythology. ...read more.

Middle

Since the lamassu monsters were ment for garding gates and entries into cities the sculptor designed it for a corner. Most of them actually have five legs, two from the front and for legs in motion from the side veiw. This provided a conceptual picture of the animal making it more realistic and therefor better to do its job of frighten people, which is one key difference from the calm egyptian art. The mesopotamian art seems to strive for fear and the importance of the high ranking officials. For example Sargon, a king of mesopotamia, once wrote in an inscription "i built a city with the labours of the peoples subdued by my hand..." A lot of their art depicts war and the hunting of animals. The Egyptians were one of the first major civilizations to codify design elements in art. ...read more.

Conclusion

Almost all of their art is calm, cool, and collect. The people who are you usually sculpted such as pharahs and important people seem not to be looking at the people who are looking at the art but seem to be focusing on a higher power of something of spiritual importance. The egyptians seem to display in their art that the individual is not important but that the spiritual world is what they are more in touch with. A lot of the art possesses a certain stiffness, with figures poised upright and rigid in a most regal fashion. Bodily proportions also appear to be mathematically perfect, giving rise to a sense of fantastic perfection in the figures depicted. This most likely was used to reinforce the godliness of the ruling society. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Art section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Art essays

  1. Romanticism vs Classicism

    Artists commonly employ natural yet vibrant colors giving the paintings a warm glow. Such traits reflect the Romantic view of life in which the individual is always the focus surrounded by a harmonic environment. Frequently, this environment is over embellished; it is portrayed as a welcoming, and magnificent Eden rather than the unforgiving environment it can so often be.

  2. "The Renaissance Is An Important Landmark In The History Of Art, But In Other ...

    The most prolific of all Humanist Christians was Erasmus. A reformer but not a protestant, as he never left the church, he translated the bible in it's current Latin form and undermined the church edition, not with his writings but the simple word to word translation. He and others referred back to ancient Hebrew and Arabic and found wrongdoings

  1. The Representation of Women in Pre-Raphaelite Art

    The most symbolic aspects of the painting are objects around the domestic space. In the wallpaper, the corn is left unguarded by the watchers, and thus it is not protected from birds. Like the corn, a woman's chastity needs to be strongly shielded.

  2. One Art

    By using "I", the tone changes once more-it is now the poet who speaks from her own experiences and shares them with the reader-and her writing is now personalized and humanized. Through personalization, the reader can catch a glimpse into the poet's thoughts and emotions-but only a glimpse at first,

  1. Why is Chartres cathedral of such outstanding importance in the study of Gothic art ...

    era it is interesting for an architect to see the original design of pier which was later adopted by many other cathedrals of the Gothic period. The master of Chartres dropped the traditional sexpartite vaults and adopted the "quadripartite vault, sprung over rectangular rather than square bays"16, as this was

  2. pop art

    He was born in 1928 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. but unfortunately had died in 1987 * Andy Warhol believed in the medium of photography, and worked on screenprints. * When we speak of Andy Warhol pictures we are speaking of not only two kinds of pictures but of a distinctive era

  1. Part II: Shih as a concept applied in Chinese Art, Calligraphy,

    As such, one sees not simply the static form of character, but a continuing transforming process of the stroke-one sees the force of form. Two calligraphy example (please see Appendix A) demonstrates how the cursive calligraphy's continuous surplus movement achieve the flow and continuity of the dynamism-compare to the stable, discrete, discontinuous structure of regular writing.

  2. Artist Profile - Michael Brennand-Wood

    when he was a child growing up in a mill in rural north England, his grandmother was an industrial weaver, so Michael would often play with fabric and cloth, his grandmother also taught him the basics of needlecraft such as knitting, sewing and embroidery.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work