• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Report on Supermarket Survey

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Report on Supermarket Survey To: Managing Director Introduction I have carried out market research on a variety of people, about what supermarkets they prefer to shop at, why, and what extras of the supermarket they use. I asked 10 people who live in different areas of the country in my questionnaire: I asked 6 Females and 4 males. 1 of them was aged between 20 and 30, 3 people were aged between 30 and 40, 4 of them were aged between 40 and 50, 1 person was aged between 50 and 60 and 1 person was over 80. Field Research The first and second question I asked were about gender and age. (Above) The third question I asked was how many times they visited a supermarket per week. 2 people said 1 time a week, 6 people said 2 times a week and 2 people said that they went 3 times a week. Next, I asked the question, "Which supermarket do you shop at most?" The response was fairly mixed. Tesco was the most popular supermarket with 5 people out of 10 choosing to shop there the most. 2 people chose Sainsbury's, 1 person chose each of Asda, Booths, and Aldi. I think that Tesco was the most popular supermarket because it is the nearest one to where I live. I asked the questionnaire to people who live near me. ...read more.

Middle

This shows that the majority of supermarkets offer a delivery system service. The next question I asked was "If your supermarket does offer a delivery service, then do you use it?" 1 person replied with yes and 9 people replied with no. This shows that the majority of people don't use the delivery system. The following question I asked was "Does your supermarket offer a loyalty card?" 7 people said yes and 3 people said no. This shows that the majority of supermarkets offer a loyalty card. Next, I posed the question "If your supermarket does have a loyalty card did it attract you to your chosen supermarket?" 3 people said yes and 7 people said no. This shows that the majority of people weren't attracted by the loyalty card on offer. The penultimate question I asked was "What type of food do you mainly buy from your supermarket?" 3 people said premium, 2 people said own brand and 5 people said they bought branded goods. The final question I asked was "How do you travel to your supermarket? Ten out of ten people that I asked said they travel by car to their supermarket. Conclusion and Recommendations From my questionnaire, I can conclude many things. The most popular supermarket among my respondents was Tesco. This was probably because it is the nearest supermarket to where I based my questionnaire. ...read more.

Conclusion

From this research I can suggest that supermarkets would stop the loyalty card and reduce the price of goods in the shop. Include in my questionnaire was the question, "What type of food do you buy from your supermarket?" The most popular answer was branded goods. I think that this has influenced Tesco and Sainsbury's success, as they sell many different goods. When I did my price survey I noticed that the smaller supermarkets like Aldi didn't sell the popular branded goods e.g. Walkers, Coca-Cola and Heinz. Perhaps if they started to sell more of these popular branded goods and less own brand goods they would get more interest and a better reputation for selling high quality goods. Saying this, this would affect the price of goods and they may loose their reputation as "Budget Supermarkets". The final question I asked in the questionnaire was "How do you travel to your supermarket?" All ten people replied with 'car'. Therefore, if a supermarket was planning to spend some money on the access to the supermarket I would recommend that they spend the money on easy access for cars or extend the car park, rather than investing in something like a cycle track, shuttle bus or improved foot access. They could also invest in disabled or mother and baby parking facilities. I hope that my recommendation influence decisions made by supermarkets in the future. Tom Harris 09/05/07 Parklands High School Business Studies ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Marketing and Markets section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Marketing and Markets essays

  1. This report will give an overview of ebay,

    They also trade with internationally with different countries therefore they have to abide by different laws and regulations e.g. organs would be unethical to sell in certain countries. Thomas cook cater for all segments so they have different laws regarding airlines hotels etc.

  2. Opening an Arcade – Feasibility Study

    Liability for the business is shared among partners. There are also some limitations to this structure. All profits have to be shared amongst the owners. Partners may have differences of opinion and disagree on the running of the business. Any descision made by one partner on behalf of the company is legally binding.

  1. Strategic Marketing Report - Virgin Trains

    Q: What price should the product be placed at? In this section there would be information about: * Old price of service * Competitors price * Income of consumers * Acceptable limit from consumers * Cost of production * Variability's that may affect * Areas of selling Socio-demographic/geographic etc * Average wage for that segment * Average leisure spending

  2. Marketing Thorpe Park and London Dungeons.

    Nemesis Inferno Shop Thorpe Park consumers find plenty of sweets and souvenirs at the exit of this infamous ride. They can stop and browse while their waiting for their pulse to slow down. Products and Facilities Products and facilities contain both goods and services.

  1. Plannng and research. I would like to open a African restaurant, food from all ...

    Instead of discounting, consider no strings offers that do not rely on percentages. Examples include value-added perks such as free valet parking, complimentary services, merchandise, etc. And, in a related topic, never offer coupons, only offer certificates. Business socials - some restaurant owners are unreceptive or apathetic to hosting business socials with outside organizations at their establishment.

  2. Cadbury Limited.

    * When framing questions. -I must consider the language used in the questionnaire, (simple and specific). No jargon, slang or local terms, as some people may not understand them. -I must ask only one thing in a single question. -Make sure questions aren't ambiguous. -Don't ask people to recall events that happened long ago.

  1. Elegant Report

    Societal marketing determines that an organisation should determine the needs wants and interests or target markets and deliver satisfaction more effectively and efficiently than competitors in a way, that maintains or improves the consumers and society's well being. Business ethics and environmental issues are increasingly important in marketing today.

  2. Elegant Report

    Customer must see value to them in their own terms; recognize the benefit(s) as different. The company must develop relationship marketing in order the customer to buy again and again, which can be done by relationship marketing. The only route to more shareholder value is to create more value for customers.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work