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AC Bradley subtitled the play, "The Redemption of Lear." What do think he meant by this comment and how far do you agree?

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Introduction

AC Bradley subtitled the play, "The Redemption of Lear." What do think he meant by this comment and how far do you agree? AC Bradley's condemnation of King Lear is reminiscent of the typical Christian critical approach and interpretation to, "King Lear," which employs the idea that the play illustrates Christian virtues. The, "Redemption of Lear," is in congruence and could be interpreted as the Salvation of Lear, which falls in line with the salvation of Christ Jesus- a highly Christian perspective and proves Bradley's hypothesis worthy of its origins. Furthermore this interpretation is also in line with that of humanist critics such as Kettle, who call the process the, "Humanising," of Lear and emphasises the value of the human experience of Lear- and that the play becomes a story of his progress from being a vain king to a sensitive man. These two differently originated interpretations congressing to an analogous conclusion I deeply agree with: Lear indeed ceases to be a vain and egotistical king and becomes a considerate and altruistic man. Cleary shown here.............. It is more than fitting that Bradley, subtitled the play, "The Redemption of Lear," as the play originated partly from the book written by Geoffrey Of Monmouth's "History Regum Brittaniae," (History of the King of Britain). ...read more.

Middle

Similarly, Biff Loman in, "Death of a Salesman," in which he also is, "Blind," to the truth reaches his anagnorisis through his gaining of self-awareness. For these three characters their discoveries are too late because neither of them can prevent their own tragedy, Othello and Desdemona's death; Willy Loman's suicide and Lear's eventual death. However, all three do face redemption. The banishment of his daughter, Cordelia, which comes about from her repetitive reply to his questioning to the extent of her love as, "Nothing," because of her in ability to summarise her feelings revokes Lear because of his, "hubris," to reply to her in a vile, tyrannical and rash sense ordering her banishment. The terms he uses, "Without our grace, our love and benison," are highly reminiscent of a curse, and show just how despicable and ghastly Lear is, especially towards his own daughter. This is highlighted further in Act 1:4 which also demonstrates Lear's egotistical sense of mind in the gravely disconcerting attributions he makes towards Goneril, cursing her sexuality. "Dry up in her organs of increase," which is truly disturbing. The Jacobean audience would have been utterly dismayed by this, as they disproved and moreover were frightened by vile language that reputed curses and was similar to that of much hated witch craft. ...read more.

Conclusion

Whether or not he dies, as written, of pneumonia or more implicitly of a broken heart as Seneca says, "They are the silent grief's that cut the heart- strings," only highlights that Bradley's subtitle is more than suitable bearing in mind that Shakespeare creates an entirely new character to allow Lear's redemption. Paradoxically the speech in Act 2:4 also shows the start of something which runs parallel with the madness: a growing concern for and the understanding of the experience of the, "Poor naked wretches." The one seems dependant on the other: and of course it is the second of these two characteristics which brings about the, "Redemption," or, "Humanising," of Lear. Lear's own language is hugely revealing in this speech of the loss of self control and the beginnings of, "Impatience," in the Elizabthan sense, in Act 2:4 "And let not women's weapons, water- drops, Stain my man's cheeks! No, you unnatural hags, I will have such revenges on you both That all the world shall- I will do such things" He is trying here to be authoritative and intelligent by reverting to the courtly idiom that Goneril and Regan utilize in this scene and that he was capable of using in the first Act. Nonetheless he is failing miserably which is publicized through the violation of his syntax. The hyphen divulges that he cannot finish his sentence because he is so inundated by his emotions. ...read more.

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