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At the end of the play Malcolm refers to Lady Macbeth as 'Macbeth's fiend-like queen.' How fair of a description do you consider this to be?

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Introduction

At the end of the play Malcolm refers to Lady Macbeth as 'Macbeth's fiend-like queen.' How fair of a description do you consider this to be? The play is based around Macbeth and his transformation from being a 'hero' to a 'tyrant' all because of his ambition. But it is not only Macbeth's ambition that transformed him for his wife, Lady Macbeth, also encouraged him into doing what was though of as sacrilegious, to kill a king. Although Shakespeare called the play 'Macbeth' Lady Macbeth played just as big a part as her husband. If it were not for her determination and cunning then Macbeth would have never succeeded in obtaining the throne. In the days that Shakespeare wrote this play many people actually believed in the supernatural and witches. Seeing so many paranormal beings in a play (e.g. witches and ghosts) would most likely horrify them. The audience do not expect to see a delicate woman such as Lady Macbeth acting like a witch. ...read more.

Middle

During the opening of the play, she only seems hungry for power and Macbeth, being so easy to manipulate, is someone who can help her achieve her goal. Macbeth is her doll and she can move him whichever way she wants. She does seem 'fiend-like' and many people think that she is the reason why Macbeth killed the king. If it were not for her ambition he would have never committed the murder. But her ambition drove Macbeth's own ambition causing him to make decisions without the need for discussing them with his wife. Lady Macbeth's nature changes in Act Three Scene Two. Although she has succeeded in gaining the throne she does not seem happy. She feels insecure and doubtful joy but as soon as Macbeth enters the room she becomes controlling again. She tells him to be bright at the feast and to think not of Duncun. Even though Lady Macbeth is still acting dominant Macbeth has planned the death of Banquo without her consent. ...read more.

Conclusion

Macbeth does not seem to care much about her death, his words seem deep but with no compassion. His reaction to the death of the wife that he had once loved so much shows how much he has changed. I believe that Lady Macbeth is a very important character to the play. She is there to help show the change in Macbeth and how he treats her as an equal at the beginning of the play and how he thinks of her as a burden near the end. Macbeth forgets that if it were not for his wife then he would not be a king. I would consider Lady Macbeth being 'evil' and 'fiend-like' in the first acts but later she changes. She does not seem so domineering and you begin to pity her. She gets neglected by Macbeth and looses the witch-like part of her. She becomes thought of as misunderstood and somebody to feel sorry for. Overall I do not think of Lady Macbeth as 'fiend-like' for, although she committed many sins, she truly felt guilty for the things that she had done and this guilt drove her man. ...read more.

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