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Blake: The Lamb and The Tyger.

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Introduction

Blake: The Lamb and The Tyger 'The Lamb' seems like it is written through the eyes of an innocent child. Like a child the lamb is not fully-grown and still possesses the innocence of youth and it is shown in the poem. It talks about a kind and selfless creator. The use of rhetorical questioning followed by an immediate and simple answer, 'Dost thou know who made thee? / Little Lamb, I'll tell thee,' adds to the childlike quality. Like a child he doesn't question things. The Lamb's gentle nature is emphasised by the word choices about the creator that calm and soothe ('tender,' 'meek,' and 'woolly') and the verbs of giving used such as 'made' and 'gave', finally the setting - a meadow. Another means by which the poet reassures the reader of the gentle and benevolent nature of the creator is through the use of repetition, which allows for a very predictable and simple presentation which is nothing less than intentionally child-like, 'Little Lamb, God Bless thee! ...read more.

Middle

Other alliterations like 'burning bright,' 'distant deeps' and 'what wings' each help create a type of feeling and emotion that is prevalent to the line. The alliteration is successful because it draws you in to the musical meter and makes the sound stick in your mind. The creation verbs 'twist, 'dare,' 'burnt,' and 'seize' foreground the danger and daring of the creation act, while the place of creation is described as a distant, fiery, furnace. And the 'hammer,' 'anvil,' and 'furnace' are images of an industrial revolution which Blake would have seen approaching in his lifetime. These all position the reader to think that the creator of the Tyger is different to the creator of the Lamb. The miss spelling of tiger suggests the exotic or alien quality of the beast. Another idea is that the 'y' in 'Tyger' is acting as the question 'why?' which is the whole point of the poem - questioning. ...read more.

Conclusion

They're several comparisons between the two poems, for example, in both poems the narrator is speaking directly to each animal. They are both seen only through a particular point of view. Both 'The Tyger' and 'The Lamb' are about creation. Both the creatures are asked about their creator. Both animals exist in the human heart that both are creations of God and, lastly, that both natures also exist in God. Lambs and tigers are extraordinarily different animals. But are they so different that we would wonder whether God might have made them both? A lamb is a symbol of innocence. A tiger, on the other hand, is a ferocious, fearsome, and violent creature and can thus be taken as a symbol of evil. In contrast to the pastoral setting of the innocent lamb, the tiger is born out of the depths of our consciousness. Blake uses the metaphor of fire to describe the way the tiger sees and is seen. This is not the unpretentious vision of the lamb. By Tom Walker Tom Walker ...read more.

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