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By the end of the first four chapters of William Goldings Lord of the Flies, the boys have changed a great deal since their arrival on the island. What do you consider the most important changes?

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Introduction

By the end of the first four chapters of William Goldings Lord of the Flies, the boys have changed a great deal since their arrival on the island. What do you consider the most important changes? William Golding writes of a group of schoolboys placed on an island, to show how humans react without a figure of authority to determine whats right and whats wrong. The book chronicles the deterioration of order and how the boys' characters form and emerge from the group. The first four chapters are a period of introduction and development where we meet the characters and see how they fit into place in the formation of the islands' hierarchy. The first boy we meet is Ralph, who we immediately meet as the archetypal schoolboy. He is tall with fair hair and has the appearance of being physically fit. He is also described as "having a mildness about his mouth and eyes that proclaimed no devil." The second boy we meet is Piggy, Piggy is short fat and wears glasses. He also seems to have a cockney accent suggesting that he and Ralph come from different social backgrounds. ...read more.

Middle

Within the group this means that the younger boys have someone to look up to and can now turn to when they need to find out what to do, progress can be made as the leader chooses people to do different jobs such as building shelter. The boys now settle into a routine. However in the second chapter we see the boys light a fire on top of the mountain, surely something not allowed at home. The fire rages out of control and then settles down to a small fire, could this be significant of things to come? During the second chapter we see the boys starting to fend for themselves and Jack, who is still in charge of the choir proclaims them to be hunters. Jack is turning into a hunter and trying to take the lead whilst Ralph quietly keeps control, with Piggy by his side, supporting his every word. He becomes a sort of parental figure always pointing out the downside to the boys' behaviour. He says about the fire, "My you've made a big heap!" He also urges the need for practical considerations, for example shelters after the cold they experienced without them. ...read more.

Conclusion

Jack finally kills but enthusiasm over the kill is small because the boys are pre-occupied with the thought that they could've been rescued, Jack is annoyed at this and he punches Piggy, breaking the lens of one of his glasses. Jack has lost the urgency of rescue and is focusing on survival instead this is his natural instinct coming through as opposed to what society has taught him to do. The boys cook the pig they caught but Piggy is not given any because he didn't hunt. Simon feels guilty because he didn't hunt either and gave his meat to Piggy. This is evidence that Simon is kind and generous. By the end of chapter four the boy's efforts to replicate the order and structure of the society and the environment they have come from are disjointed and unproductive. Jack has become a hunter and his group of followers, savages. This is because they have no one to enforce the learning and rules of previous years. All the boys have changed a great deal and the most important reason for this is the lack of adult presence. Laura Eyles English coursework, lord of the flies ...read more.

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