Lord of the Flies - Simon's character.

Throughout the story Simon is kind and thoughtful. When Jack insults Piggy, Simon always tries to manipulate what Jack has said into a compliment. Simon also confronts Jack in acts of courage to help Piggy. One of these times is when Simon goes to Jack after Jack has taken Piggy's specs, and he takes them off Jack and returns them to Piggy. He then defends Piggy, when Jack is trying to convict Piggy of not helping to start the fire. Simon says 'We used his specs...he helped that way'. This shows that he has some affection and sympathy for Piggy. In the novel, Simon's character is a Christ figure. Everything he does is good. All the other boys on the island have the secret 'inner evil', which only Simon can fight against. This 'inner evil' is William Golding's idea as to why people do evil things. He believed that when you are born you have a certain amount of good and a certain amount of evil inside you. He believed that as you go through your life you would show bits of evil at any time. The only problem is that the evil would be totally out of your control. Some people only show small amounts of evil, and others would turn completely evil, like Roger or the 'pig's head'- the Lord of the Flies itself. Simon is completely good because he has controlled the amount of evil showing form his body, down to a minimum. On the island there are different objects and characters,

  • Word count: 1816
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
Access this essay

How does Golding convince you that the conch is important in this novel Lord of the Flies.

How does Golding convince you that the conch is important in this novel? There are several themes and symbols in the novel Lord of the Flies, and one of the most important ones is the conch and its democratic role. To the boys it is only a shell, but it holds values, which help keep their society together, so therefore Golding implies its importance. Ralph and Piggy find the conch at the beginning. Piggy immediately recognises it, as he has seen one like it before, on somebody's wall at home. "" Careful! You'll break it-------"" expresses how much Piggy respects and values it. Golding explicitly describes the shell with elegance. "In colour the shell was deep cream, touched here and there with fading pink. Between the point, worn away into a little hole, and the pink lips of the mouth, lay eighteen inches of shell with a slight spiral twist and covered with delicate, embossed pattern." He uses language, which is smooth and almost poetic, which portrays it as an ornament. Only Piggy grasps that it is worth a lot of money and has to be treated with care, whereas Ralph sees it as an object, which has an interesting and aesthetically pleasing appearance. The importance of the conch is reinforced as the title of the first chapter, 'The Sound of The Shell'. When Ralph sounds the conch for the first time he is overwhelmed by how loud it is. "The birds cried, small animals

  • Word count: 665
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
Access this essay

Ralph is changed by his expectations on the island. How does Golding show this?

Ralph is changed by his expectations on the island. How does Golding show this? Golding uses several ways to describe and show what is meant. One of the characters that Golding has used writing to show how he has changed is Ralph. Ralph is firstly described as a child with no sense of responsibility. After he is selected as leader and several situations occur on the island, he becomes a good realistic leader. Ralph is one of the first characters described in the book. Before anything else, Golding introduces two characters. One we later find is called Ralph, another named Piggy. When Ralph first finds himself on the Island he doesn't appear to have a vast sense of responsibility, or to be very mature in his thoughts. We can see this as when Piggy asks 'All them other kids...Some of them must have got out. They must have, mustn't they?' Ralph's reply is to get up and casually walk over to the water. Golding, instead of having Ralph reply 'I don't care' or another known ignorant phrase has written that he just gets up and casually walks over to the water. This is not only a different way of showing that Ralph is not too bothered about being responsible, but creates a question in the readers' mind. 'What is it with this character?' and can cause them to become tense, wanting to find out more. In the same conversation with Piggy, Ralph is again shown to have no real sense of

  • Word count: 1381
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
Access this essay

The Lord of the Flies in Different Interpretations.

The Lord of the Flies in Different Interpretations The novel 'Lord of the Flies' can be interpreted at a number of different views. Lord of the Flies refers to Beelzebub, another name for the devil. He is also called the Lord of Filth and Dung. Throughout the novel, the children grow dirtier and dirtier, an outward reflection of their inner state. As their savagery and evil increases, they seek a symbol, a god to worship. When Jack and his hunters kill a boar, they have their opportunity; they leave the pig's head impaled on a stake as an offering to the beast. The head is soon rotting and covered with flies. The head, referred to as the "Lord of the Flies" then serves as a symbol of the evil and savagery of Jack's tribe of hunters. At the end of the novel, Ralph, with disgust, knocks the boar's skull to the ground and seizes the stick to use as a spear. He understands the evil that surrounds him in the person of Jack, and he seeks to destroy it. The novel is an adventure story as a whole. It is about the struggle of survival and dominance. It gives us an idea of what young boys may have to do in real life situations. Permitting Ralph who is saved by 'Deus ex Machina.' This means 'god coming down on a machina. This is very classical in terms of the adventure story. Lord of the Flies is an intrigue of the assumption of Ballantyne's Coral Island. In Coral Island, three

  • Word count: 1466
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
Access this essay

Lord of the Flies Coursework A consideration of the ways in which a sense of pessimism about human nature is conveyed in the first four chapters of 'Lord of the Flies'.

Lord of the Flies Coursework A consideration of the ways in which a sense of pessimism about human nature is conveyed in the first four chapters of 'Lord of the Flies'. William Golding's 'Lord of the Flies' was based primarily on the book 'Coral Island' in which children find an island and live there in Utopia. Golding's thoughts on this were that it simply couldn't be done; so he creates a Utopia; a paradise for young boys to take refuge as a plane crash leaves them stranded. They are safe and in a place where everything is perfect as their nature slowly tilts them to their own instinct; their basic survival code. These boys become almost animal; their vicious potential for evil shines through. Within this novel there is an incredible amount of pessimism of human nature. Golding brings to life the reality of life, that there is evil inside of us; just waiting to unfold. The author brings across this negative image of human nature mainly by showing the development of the main characters, for instance Jack, Ralph and Roger and how the sense of evil is brought to reality in what these people do and say. Even the island itself promotes Dystopia, sure at times it may be beautiful and perfect but as the atmosphere changes; so does the scenery. Within this essay I am going to explain and show my point that there is pessimistic view of human nature within this novel. Even from

  • Word count: 2402
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
Access this essay

Is Golding's view of humanity entirely pessimistic?

Is Golding's view of humanity entirely pessimistic? Taking a post at the Maidstone Grammar School for boys and joining the Royal Navy, gave Golding his understanding of boys and cynical view of the war. William Golding says, "the theme (of the book) is an attempt to trace back the defects of society to the defects of human nature..." Golding's view of humanity is clearly displayed throughout Lord of the Flies. Through the constant symbolism we are made aware of Golding's pessimism towards society. As the book progresses he forms an allegory between the island and the real world. When the boys first arrive on the island they are full of enthusiasm and are eager to begin a new, civilised society. We witness immediately the voting in of Ralph as chief and the introduction of rules, "we'll have rules!" The conch is discovered and instantly a democratic society is established. As a result of this, assemblies take place, issues are discussed and decisions are made. At this stage there is a strong sense of order. The capability of the boys to construct such a society is impressive and reflects a positive view of humanity. The question of rescue is soon resolved with fire and the choir is content with watching it and hunting. The impression Golding gives is one of optimism and cheerfulness. The boys have come from a civilised and cultured society and they are dedicated

  • Word count: 1826
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
Access this essay

The Way to Lead (Lord of the Flies)

Charlotte Vergara CV1 Mrs. Gittins ENG2D Friday, January 7, 2005 The Way to Lead Lord of the Flies, a novel written by William Golding, concerns a group of British boys who are stranded on a deserted island after their plane is shot down during the war. The boys have to survive using only the island's resources. A leader is needed to control the boys, and Ralph is voted leader though Jack thinks he is better than Ralph. However, Ralph is a better leader than Jack. Ralph focuses on being rescued and being able to survive for a long time, whereas Jack is only concerned about daily survival. Ralph is more of a democratic leader, listening to other people's ideas and suggestions, and distributing work evenly among the boys, while Jack only cares about himself and wants to do things his own way. Lastly, Ralph sets down rules they must follow in order to keep them civilized, unlike Jack, who wants everyone to follow him and do whatever he wants to do, which eventually leads them to savagery. In the early chapters of the novel, Ralph directs the group's focus on the hope for rescue. He feels it is necessary to keep a fire burning in case a ship or a plane is passing by. Ralph explains that the purpose of the fire was to let the smoke being emitted from it lure the ship or plane to the island and allow the boys to be rescued, "There's another thing. We can

  • Word count: 1023
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
Access this essay

Was the police to blame for not capturing Jack the Ripper?

Was the police to blame for not capturing Jack the Ripper? Today I'm going to decide if the police were to blame for not catching Jack the Ripper. One of the reasons for not catching Jack the Ripper is he was smart, he must of planned out how he was going to do the murders before he actually done them, so he planned out he was going to get away which made it harder for the police to catch him, this is not the police's fought that he did this. Also the police had a lack of forensic science so they couldn't get blood samples, fingerprints, sperm samples, saliva and so on... which is also not a fought of the police. When Jack killed his victims he didn't leave any evidence that would link to himself, he rarely left a part of the body on! Which made it harder to get evidence. Also the police would have received a number of bogus eyewitness accounts and reports that led to them being more and more away from catching him. Also people in the area of white chapel didn't like the police and was reluctant to help them, which made it harder for the police. And even if the public was telling the truth, they couldn't always be sure. Also the area of white chapel was a big place with hundreds of small alleys and roads which were easy to run down to get away or hide from the police they that's why Jack probably committed them down there because of the layout of the

  • Word count: 388
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
Access this essay

Fear Schedule.

Fear Schedule Jack knew there was something out there; something trudging the hallway in the early hours of the morning. Although he never saw it visually, he sensed it's presence in the small dark room. Mysterious footsteps in the hallway on the creaking floor, a sudden drop of temperature and soft - whispered mumblings in the darkest depths of the room sent this eight - year old boy into a paranoid frenzy. .............................. Jack was as ordinary eight - year old, he attended school and shared the same interest as young boys his own age. The death of his mother when he was six years old hit him hard, he felt he had no will to go on and because his father Bill had fallen in to a state of emotional tatters young Jack was left to deal with his emotion by himself. He asked himself many questions, how could God do such a thing to him, how could he cause so much pain? He even began to question his belief in the existence of God. God works in Mysterious ways. ............................ Jack lay in bed struggling for breath, his heart was beating like a drum and his chest felt like a pin cushion. H e was having an asthma attack. He pulled his duvet over his head; he felt it would protect him. H screamed as loud as he could, he felt the shout echoed in his own ears. His father raced up to stairs bringing the nebulizer with him, he placed the mask over Jacks

  • Word count: 978
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
Access this essay

The Development of Fa in The Inheritors

The Development Of Fa Consider a character who develops in the novel, and with detailed reference to style and themes, explain the development and its significance. 'The Inheritors' by William Golding explores the elimination of the Neanderthals by the homosapiens. The novel follows the two survivors, Lok and Fa, both pure of heart yet both led into corruption by the new world they have been lured into. While Lok cannot comprehend, Fa begins to with the progression of the novel, thus having to be relied upon to lead them to salvation. This provokes her character development; one that contrasts both to the Neanderthals and to the 'New People', and one that helps convey the novel's deeper significance. In this essay I shall explore this development and explain its significance to the novel. The initial impression of Fa conveys her simple and primitive thought patterns. Her incomprehension of 'the log has gone away' conveys how she trusts nature, and cannot understand why it would deceive or confuse her in this way. Yet even in the initial stages of the novel, the fact that she has a more intellectual awareness than Lok is conveyed. 'She looked at him accusingly' suggests that even though it isn't possible Lok could have removed the Log, she has enough basic understanding to comprehend that somebody did, which contrasts to Lok's idea that the Log had moved itself. Her

  • Word count: 1796
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
Access this essay