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Childhood Memories.

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Introduction

Gary Cummings. Childhood Memories. Dad said, "We're going for a ride on the bus." "Ride to where," I thought excitedly. I remember waiting in the bus station; people going about their business. The bus we got on was huge, with room for at least a hundred people, with plenty of room. It was a cold, windy evening. I sat at the front so I could see out of the window. Bright lights were heading towards us. It seemed as though we had been travelling for hours. The bus stopped a few times to pick people up, on the way. A man got on and sat down near to us. "Hello, young'un," he said. I was too frightened to answer; he was tall and wore a flat cap and an overcoat. Dad said, "Don't worry son, this is your uncle Roger. He's an old mate of mine." Uncle Roger. "I didn't know I had an Uncle Roger." To me, he could have been the man in the moon. ...read more.

Middle

"Come on, I'll show you to your room," she said. I was so excited. Dad picked up the suitcase and followed Nana. I followed closely behind, marching up the never-ending stairs that seemed to go on forever. "You can sleep in here," said Nana. The room was huge. It had three single beds. "I've put the electric blankets on for you, your beds will be nice and warm when you get in them tonight." "Electric blanket," I thought to myself. "We've only got hot water bottles at home." We went into the kitchen where Nana had made us some supper. The kitchen was huge. My eyes, wandered around. I noticed that there were some tins on the top shelf. But they were so tall. "Why are the tins so big?" I asked my Dad, He replied. "They are full of powder, you mix it with water to make soup." "Yuk powdered soup, how disgusting." As the night wore on my Nana said, "I'm off to bed, I'll see you in the morning." ...read more.

Conclusion

I slowly opened the door. It was dark inside. I remember there was a pair of red curtains draped from the window. I slowly walked inside heart beating faster. Suddenly, I heard a voice; "There's nothing in there for you." It was my Nana, back from the shop. I started crying. "I was only looking, I saw you go in there last night but didn't see you come out." I'd only known my Nana for five minutes and already getting told off. "Don't cry, I'll show you what's inside." She put the light on and to my surprise there was a huge bed and a wardrobe. We've barely got any room under our stairs at home. As time went by, Dad said. "Well son, we'll have to go and catch the bus home." Nana came to see us off; she gave us both a kiss. "Don't forget where I live." She said. I only saw my Nana a few times after that she died in June 1978. When I visit Keswick now, I make a point of going to see my Nanas house. It feels strange seeing the house knowing that my Nana isn't there anymore. -2- ...read more.

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