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Civilisation and Savagery in Lord of the Flies

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Introduction

CIVILISATION AND SAVAGERY By Jackie Jin 10K When the boys first arrived on the island they automatically seeked for some kind of law and order since there are not any grown-ups. They want to belong to a group, with someone in charge to lead them, and make them feel safe. After being chosen in a democratic election, Ralph becomes this leader. Ralph's society becomes a symbol of the democratic society, where everyone has their rights and an equal say. He assigned the choir as hunters and Jack the position of being the leader of them. ...read more.

Middle

But there is a difference between these two deaths, as Simon's death was accidental and Piggy's death was deliberate. This shows the darkness inside man's heart, which is released when mankind becomes savages. Fear is what provokes savagery, as Roger lost control of his actions because of fear. With the destruction of the conch along with the death of Piggy, it also shows the destruction of authority and civilisation. Jack and the hunters show that mankind are inheritantly evil, if left alone to take care of themselves, fear will turn tem into the savage roots of the ancestors. ...read more.

Conclusion

Ralph represents fairness and morality while Jack represents evil and the decay of civilisation. Piggy symbolizes the law and order of the world they left behind. He attempts to act accordingly to an absolute set of standards. Roger symbolizes man's natural tendency to cause harm to others, as he evolves into a terrorist, a savage, eager to throw rocks, roll boulder and throw spears at his fellow tribe members and act as a follower of Jack to do his dirty work for him. Fear and frustration provokes the darkness of man's heart, without any law and order man will turn into savages. The events throughout the novel show the deterioration of civilisation to savagery. (444 words) ...read more.

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