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Compare 4 of Thomas Hardy's poems In this essay I will compare The Going, Beeny Cliff, The Voice and Your Last Drive by Thomas Hardy. I will discuss the ways in which he presents an image of his late wife Emma.

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Introduction

� Compare 4 of Thomas Hardy's poems In this essay I will compare The Going, Beeny Cliff, The Voice and Your Last Drive by Thomas Hardy. I will discuss the ways in which he presents an image of his late wife Emma. The Going, like most of his poems about Emma, is written in the first person. Hardy is obviously speaking for himself. It is in a monologue form, addressing Emma asking question, that only she could answer. Similarly to this, in The Voice, it is almost as if Hardy is trying to communicate with Emma. This poem, as with The Going, is also in the first person and Hardy imagines that Emma is talking to him, telling him that she is not the aged woman she had become through their marriage, but the woman she was when their "day was fair". Again, Your Last Drive is addressed to Emma. ...read more.

Middle

He questions his wife, for example, "Why do you make me leave the house" an "Why did you give no hint that night", which seems almost as if he is blaming her. He implies that she did not forewarn him of her death, but left him "indifferent quite". He comments on how, as the day emerged, he was unaware of what would happen to her. He then asks her, why she makes him go outside, as, just for a moment he senses she is there. However he sees only "yawning blankness". Like The Going, The Voice also contains this accusational tone, the repetition of "you" seems reproachful. Contrasting to this, Beeny Cliff presents Hardy as miserable and grief-stricken at the death of Emma, as he reflects on her life and the time they spent away together. "The woman now is elsewhere... and will laugh there nevermore". Your Last Drive tells of how Hardy's wife went on a journey shortly before she died. ...read more.

Conclusion

Similarly, The Going starts off with the same dismal tone. However, in The Going, Hardy seems a bit less reluctant to accept what has happened "Where I could not follow... To gain one glimpse of you ever anon!" Contrasting to this, The Voice begins brightly, with Hardy's hope that Emma is contacting him. But as the poem ends, he realises that the "voice" is imaginary. The vigorous sound at the start of the poem, expresses Hardy's hope and anticipation at the belief he can hear/feel her. It then appears to be too much for Hardy. This is show in the third stanza, where "listlessness" rhymes with "existlessness" (he had to coin a word), and yet again, is the repeated phrase "no more again" in the last line. Finally, Beeny Cliff, like The Voice, has a positive tone. Hardy is reflecting on his and Emma's shared youth and obviously has reason to be happy. The alliteration in the lines "flapping free" and "loyally loved", for example, emphasize his pleasure at reminiscing and have positive connotations. ...read more.

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