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Compare and contrast The Flea by John Donne and To His Coy Mistress by Andrew Marvell and comment on which is the most effective in the art of persuasion.

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Introduction

Compare and contrast The Flea by John Donne and To His Coy Mistress by Andrew Marvell and comment on which is the most effective in the art of persuasion. "The Flea" by John Donne is written in the 17th century as is "To his coy mistress" by Andrew Marvell. This we can see by the language used which was typical of that period in time "apt to kill me" and "yea" which are taken from the flea. Both poems also speak of virginity being very important, especially before marriage because if a woman had lost her "maidenhead" before, the husband would have the right to leave her without the need for a divorce. Both poems have the same theme of seduction. In "The flea" this is put across in each in three regular stanzas where as "To His Coy Mistress" is written in to sections. This is to convey that each stanza is still about the same subject because they are of similar lengths and writing style. ...read more.

Middle

"To his coy mistress" is based on the same theme as "The flea" as Marvell tries to woo his unyielding mistress with the hackneyed argument that time is exceptionally precious and does not stop for anyone or anything and that we should live for the moment, enjoying our selves to the maximum. "Times winged chariot hurrying near;" this is a reference to the Greek mythology that the sun was pulled across the sky by the God Apollo. Throughout the three similar length sections Marvell uses flattery and a strong, persuasive argument. In section one lines 1-25 Marvell uses flattery as the introduction to his line of reasoning and assures her that he will always love her, his love growing stronger as this is what she deserves and should be rightfully hers. "For, Lady, you deserve this state, Nor would I love at lower rate." In the second section of this lyric-like poem he uses the element of fear, but not in a threatening way. "Thy beauty shall no more be found" he tries to make her see that her beauty will fade and if she holds back her maidenhead (virginity) ...read more.

Conclusion

It also might have been printed as an awearness of what men were like but involving some humour and light heartediness, expressing the feelings and atitudes of that time. "The flea" was written to show how far men will go to get what they want and is also written in a sightly mocking tone of women and their views on what is important and that it is silly to hang on to your maidenhead when time is precoius and that people could die early. Marvell and Donne have very original and unique ways of writting their poems to convey each's special intended meaning. Marvell uses plenty of flattery telling his lady that she looks lovely; "skin like morning dew" linked in with rhyming patterns 4/4 at the end of each line which helps to break the poem into phrases which is easier to assess. He has written it in first person narrative "I" and "we" with strong powerful words and linking lines "Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime." The punctuation used emphasises his points perfectly. ...read more.

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