• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Compare and contrast The Flea by John Donne and To His Coy Mistress by Andrew Marvell and comment on which is the most effective in the art of persuasion.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Compare and contrast The Flea by John Donne and To His Coy Mistress by Andrew Marvell and comment on which is the most effective in the art of persuasion. "The Flea" by John Donne is written in the 17th century as is "To his coy mistress" by Andrew Marvell. This we can see by the language used which was typical of that period in time "apt to kill me" and "yea" which are taken from the flea. Both poems also speak of virginity being very important, especially before marriage because if a woman had lost her "maidenhead" before, the husband would have the right to leave her without the need for a divorce. Both poems have the same theme of seduction. In "The flea" this is put across in each in three regular stanzas where as "To His Coy Mistress" is written in to sections. This is to convey that each stanza is still about the same subject because they are of similar lengths and writing style. ...read more.

Middle

"To his coy mistress" is based on the same theme as "The flea" as Marvell tries to woo his unyielding mistress with the hackneyed argument that time is exceptionally precious and does not stop for anyone or anything and that we should live for the moment, enjoying our selves to the maximum. "Times winged chariot hurrying near;" this is a reference to the Greek mythology that the sun was pulled across the sky by the God Apollo. Throughout the three similar length sections Marvell uses flattery and a strong, persuasive argument. In section one lines 1-25 Marvell uses flattery as the introduction to his line of reasoning and assures her that he will always love her, his love growing stronger as this is what she deserves and should be rightfully hers. "For, Lady, you deserve this state, Nor would I love at lower rate." In the second section of this lyric-like poem he uses the element of fear, but not in a threatening way. "Thy beauty shall no more be found" he tries to make her see that her beauty will fade and if she holds back her maidenhead (virginity) ...read more.

Conclusion

It also might have been printed as an awearness of what men were like but involving some humour and light heartediness, expressing the feelings and atitudes of that time. "The flea" was written to show how far men will go to get what they want and is also written in a sightly mocking tone of women and their views on what is important and that it is silly to hang on to your maidenhead when time is precoius and that people could die early. Marvell and Donne have very original and unique ways of writting their poems to convey each's special intended meaning. Marvell uses plenty of flattery telling his lady that she looks lovely; "skin like morning dew" linked in with rhyming patterns 4/4 at the end of each line which helps to break the poem into phrases which is easier to assess. He has written it in first person narrative "I" and "we" with strong powerful words and linking lines "Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime." The punctuation used emphasises his points perfectly. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Andrew Marvell section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Andrew Marvell essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Compare and Contrast "To His Coy Mistress" and "The Passionate Shepherd to His Love".

    3 star(s)

    offering to the woman: he says "pull" instead of tug or heave. But Andrew Marvell creates a stronger, firmer impression with verbs like "transpire" and "devour", especially in the second and third parts of the poem where his method of persuasion has changed.

  2. Marked by a teacher

    Which of 'The Sun Rising' by John Donne and 'To His Coy Mistress' by ...

    written 'Princes' were any kind of ruler and so Donne is suggesting that though his wife is the world he rules over her. He does not even go as far as to tell us her name, addressing her as 'her' and 'she' which are impersonal pronouns.

  1. Compare and Contrast 'To His Coy Mistress' by Andrew Marvell with 'To His Mistress ...

    Donne is genuine he loves his mistress and thinks of sex as a part of their relationship. When he does flatter her, it's less flattery, more complements, his words are more realistic, he says things like "off with that girdle, like heavens zones glittering, But a far fairer world encompassing".

  2. The Metaphysical Poets: John Donne and Andrew Marvell.

    The problem is to make the claim carry some conviction, "T'was so; But this, all pleasures fancies bee. If ever any beauty I did see, Which I desir'd, and got, t'was but a dreame of thee." We can probably pass over the rather disparaging "any beauty", but it is more

  1. The two poems which I am comparing are by Andrew Marvell and John Donne ...

    Donne is arrogantly saying that 'all here in one bed lay' all the wealth and royalty in the world. In this strong hyperbole he compares his mistress to the exotic places, which sort of expresses to the reader how attractive he believes his mistress is.

  2. Examine the ways in which the poets in “The Flea” and “To His Coy ...

    It is also using Plato's philosophy of the symposium - that each person is a half, looking for their other half to make a whole. The last two lines of the poem are designed to be empowering "Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run."

  1. Compare the presentation of seduction in the poems 'To His Coy Mistress' by Andrew ...

    'Deserts of vast eternity' promotes a desolate and bleak image, which is a powerful metaphor for death and reminds his mistress when she is dead seduction will be lost and she'll be alone. Marvell's tone becomes sarcastic and mocking as he claims 'and your quaint honour turn to dust' meaning

  2. Compare and Contrast 'To his Coy Mistress' by Andrew Marvell with 'To his Mistress ...

    Donne was educated at Oxford, Cambridge and Lincoln's Inn. His works of this period, included some of his songs, sonnets (written as late as 1617), problems and paradoxes, which consisted of cynical, realistic and often sexual lyrics, essays and verse satires. Donne's court career was ruined by the discovery of his marriage in 1601 to Anne More and we

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work