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Comparing the use of German/Nazi and Jewish imagery between 'Daddy' and 'Lady Lazarus'.

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Comparing the use of German/Nazi and Jewish imagery between 'Daddy' and 'Lady Lazarus'. In both poems Silvia Plath, the author gives a lot of contrast between the Nazi/German and the Jewish imagery. When we look at the first poem 'Daddy' you can immediately see how the persona's father appears coded, first as the patriarchal statue, "Marble-heavy, a bag full of God / Ghastly statue with one grey toe." And then, shockingly, he becomes a Nazi, tormenting the persona who describes herself as a Jew. Plath could be talking about her relation with her father, but we know that these words were used to give us an image of what the person felt like as neither Plath was a Jew and even though her dad was from Germany, he was no Nazi. ...read more.


The persona then compares her father with Hitler 'and your neat moustache' and right after that he becomes a German fighter. The persona wanting to be with her father first tries to attempt suicide as this does not work she escapes of it by marrying a man with many of the father's characteristics 'A man in black with a Meincampf look'. In the Second poem 'Lady Lazarus' you again see many different German/Nazi and Jewish images. She uses a lot of extended metaphors and allusion to develop terrifying images of death that surround her attempted suicides. The speaker compares herself to a Jew. ...read more.


The persona refers to the Nazi death camps to describe her attempted suicides. By saying 'Ash, ash,' she is referring to the huge ovens that German Nazi used to burn the remains of their victims. "Wedding rings" and "gold fillings" were taken from the bodies of the victims before they were killed and burned. As you can see Silvia Plath used a lot of that contrast imagery and used metaphors and extended metaphors to make it clear to us that the persona did not like the fact her father left her so early and that he didn't have so much time for her. As for the second poem the persona wants to shock us by using all those tarrying images of what happened to Jews and what the Nazis were like. ...read more.

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