• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Comparing the use of German/Nazi and Jewish imagery between 'Daddy' and 'Lady Lazarus'.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Comparing the use of German/Nazi and Jewish imagery between 'Daddy' and 'Lady Lazarus'. In both poems Silvia Plath, the author gives a lot of contrast between the Nazi/German and the Jewish imagery. When we look at the first poem 'Daddy' you can immediately see how the persona's father appears coded, first as the patriarchal statue, "Marble-heavy, a bag full of God / Ghastly statue with one grey toe." And then, shockingly, he becomes a Nazi, tormenting the persona who describes herself as a Jew. Plath could be talking about her relation with her father, but we know that these words were used to give us an image of what the person felt like as neither Plath was a Jew and even though her dad was from Germany, he was no Nazi. ...read more.

Middle

The persona then compares her father with Hitler 'and your neat moustache' and right after that he becomes a German fighter. The persona wanting to be with her father first tries to attempt suicide as this does not work she escapes of it by marrying a man with many of the father's characteristics 'A man in black with a Meincampf look'. In the Second poem 'Lady Lazarus' you again see many different German/Nazi and Jewish images. She uses a lot of extended metaphors and allusion to develop terrifying images of death that surround her attempted suicides. The speaker compares herself to a Jew. ...read more.

Conclusion

The persona refers to the Nazi death camps to describe her attempted suicides. By saying 'Ash, ash,' she is referring to the huge ovens that German Nazi used to burn the remains of their victims. "Wedding rings" and "gold fillings" were taken from the bodies of the victims before they were killed and burned. As you can see Silvia Plath used a lot of that contrast imagery and used metaphors and extended metaphors to make it clear to us that the persona did not like the fact her father left her so early and that he didn't have so much time for her. As for the second poem the persona wants to shock us by using all those tarrying images of what happened to Jews and what the Nazis were like. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Sylvia Plath section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Sylvia Plath essays

  1. How do Hughes and Hardy both use memory in their poems?

    He is saying he is not capable of settling in this way. Throughout all of his poems, Ted talks about Fate. It's as though he thinks everything he does in his life is decided already. He speaks as though Fate had already thought what was going to happen, and it

  2. Discuss the presentation of death within Plath's poetry, commenting upon how your view compares ...

    The hospital is a silent "sterile" environment and is therefore an image of death and of lost identity "I have given my name and day-clothes up to the nurses And my history to the anaesthetist and my body to the surgeons."

  1. A response to 'Daddy' and 'Digging'.

    do, you do not do,' feel desperate and oppressive -under it, I sense a deeply oppressive tone. Note how Plath repeats the word Jew in the phrases, 'I began to talk like a Jew', 'I think I may well be a Jew', 'I may be a bit of a Jew'.

  2. Frozen Eyes -Explore and analyse the use of imagery of death and violence in ...

    Therefore by using nature - the 'two trees' he engages with her through a dimension that she can easily relate to, and that is through pathetic fallacy. Seamus Heaney clearly identifies Plath's sense of 'self-discovery and self-definition' through pathetic fallacy, as he states that nature gives Plath the opportunity to make her thoughts unlimited, just like a 'black hole'.

  1. How does Plath use imagery and symbolism to discuss the themes of life and ...

    loving associations" and is exhausting her, wearing her out. The imagery of the "old cargo boat" suggests that she has gone through a lot of problems and has to continue to even if her body cannot withstand it. She sees life as a very tough journey with continuous great storms and it can only be ended when the boat is broken, sunken, or when she dies.

  2. How does Plath's use of extended metaphors and other literary features effect the reader's ...

    However even though she has been reduced to this state of near death it still is not good enough "Stupid Pupil, it has to take everything in" This also shows she is angry at being alive. She has lost all sense of being a person.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work