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Comparision of "The Manhunt" and "Quickdraw".

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Introduction

?The Manhunt? is a first person, unconvinced account of a partner?s attempt to calm, return and draw ?close? to her partner, whose experiences have damaged him, not only physically but emotionally. The poem uses the third person to refer to the partner, suggesting a distance between them. This is contrasted with the use of rhyming couplets, indicative of togetherness. The contrast between these two techniques creates a tension between distance and closeness throughout the poem. As the woman attempts to ?find? her partner, Armitage uses metaphors to describe the injuries, both physical and mental, suggesting that the bombs and warplanes are an important part of who this man has become. Her own ?mission? is described in literal terms ? she is on a ?manhunt?, a ?search? of her own, just like her husband was in the war. ?The Manhunt? can also be seen as someone trying to gain the trust to their partner who has been through any traumatic, painful emotional experience. In this case, the battle being shown through imagery of war becomes a representation of ?emotional fighting between her and her father. ...read more.

Middle

to one another. The poet uses the second person (?you ring?,?you've wounded me?) to draw the reader into the poem and personalise the action - to make it feel like you're part of the poem. We are told that we fired the first shot, and the speaker tried to return fire only to miss. The speaker then twirls the phones like a gunfighter twirls his guns. Both poems use assonance to portray strong feelings towards the second person. In Manhunt, the poet uses the repetition of the vowel sound to show that the narrator and her husband are both apart and although she is treating to the damage done to his body, the psychological damage will only go away with time. ?Only then could I bind the struts and climb the rungs of his broken ribs?. This quote uses the long ?I? sound in ?bind? and ?climb? which shows the gentle actions of his loving wife, who is trying to care for and tender him, whereas the short snapped vowels of ?struts?, ?rungs? and ?ribs? sound as if he is broken inside. ...read more.

Conclusion

The ?silver bullet?s reflect the western battle theme and this is when the conceit in the poem has come to an end: after all the the pain the narrator has felt, the argument has finally ended with just a few kisses in a text message. It makes the reader feel as if it is just a dream where a small kiss can make everything perfect, however, in reality this argument can be ended with kisses, but in long term it will always lead to more differences. However, in the Manhunt the poet uses alliteration to show how the wife is determined to make her husband feel better. The quote ?to handle and to hold? uses this which reminds the reader of the marriage vows, where the bride and groom both promise ?to have and to hold from this day forward?. It makes the reader see her perspective and her efforts to rebuild their relationship, presenting the strong emotions she feels for her husband, to care for him in good health and in bad. ...read more.

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