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Comparison of ‘Jane Eyre’ with ‘Wide Sargasso Sea’

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Introduction

Readers Note This as a part of my GCSE coursework in English, this is about the comparison of the portrayal of the character Bertha/Antoinette Mason in the novels Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea. At the moment my teacher has not marked my work so I am unable to give the grade I achieved for this piece of work. I have altered this document before donating it to essaybank.com to help you understand what this is about. I wish good luck to anyone who has to do this task as coursework and I sincerely hope this work of mine will help them achieve a good grade. Comparison of 'Jane Eyre' with 'Wide Sargasso Sea' Task: Compare and contrast the presentation of Bertha/Antoinette Mason in the novel 'Wide Sargasso Sea' and in 'Jane Eyre'. 'Charlotte Bronte' was one of the three talented sisters in the Bronte family. All three were outstanding novelists. Charlotte Bronte wrote 'Jane Eyre.' During the nineteenth century the prejudice against women was such that they were forced to adapt pseudonyms for the initial publication of their novels, if they did not their books were unlikely to sell well or even get published. She only revealed her real identity once the book was first in the bestseller chart. ...read more.

Middle

Unlike in 'Jane Eyre' she is given a family background this destroys the image of an animal, created in 'Jane Eyre.' Now we can understand that she is no other but a normal human being. We learn in the novel that their family was ostracised from the community as they were once slave owners and so the black community hated them and eventually they revolted. They were also excluded from the English community, as Antoinette's mother was French. In addition to that Antoinette was even rejected by her own mother. As a result of this isolation and rejection from the society Antoinette's only friend was Tia who also betrayed her, by stealing her clothes and taking her valuables. This seclusion may have been the important factor in her madness. This helps the reader sympathise with Antoinette and we feel she was treated very unfairly this seclusion and rejection might have been an important factor in her madness, in 'Jane Eyre' no explanation was given for her madness. In 'Jane Eyre' the first person narration helps us sympathise and empathise with Jane. We understand her when she describes her fear of Bertha with outstanding graphic description in conjunction with animal imagery. ...read more.

Conclusion

St john is a kind of mirror image of Mr Rochester, Blanche Ingram is in the same way a reflection of Jane; Mr Brocklehurst is in the same way an echo of miss Temple. This idea of reversal or opposites is used when Bronte uses images connected with darkness and light to symbolise goodness and despair. I very much appreciate this technique as it cleverly not only portrays the character but also highlights the difference between its opposite. Descriptions of birds are frequent in the novel. References to them are always used very carefully, especially when describing Jane and Mr Rochester. Possibly she has associated Jane with birds to emphasize her delicacy and gracefulness. Books are very cleverly used as a symbol of inspiration and comfort. They help to show the contrast between Jane and Helen. References of books underline the way imagination is seen as a means of escape from reality, offering refuge and shelter from a hostile world. Dreams play an important part in the structure of the book because of where they appear in the action of the story. What the dreams reveal about the future adds to the feeling of suspense, which is an important feature of Jane Eyre's structure. Very often in the book you will find a vital link between the mood of a character and its surroundings. ...read more.

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