"The Gothic is an outlet for the repression of the society" Discuss.

"The Gothic is an outlet for the repression of the society." Discuss The gothic is shown as an outlet for the repression of the society in many ways. In Jane Eyre, immorality, women, madness and sexual desires/passions are being suppressed to ensure that they do not occur on the surface. However, the Gothic uses archetypal symbols, unexpressed passions, the double, madness, death, darkness and supernatural as an outlet for repression. Irrational and aberrant desires are shunned upon in any conservative society that functions on reason and logic. Therefore institutions like religion and moral codes are established, hitherto to modern days, to maintain a status quo and repress such behavior. The Gothic, on the other hand, provides its reader with a vicarious thrill of unleashing such behavior through its fascination with the supernatural. Through her dreams, Jane Eyre projects her inner rage towards Thornfield hall it confines her. She believes that "[t]o pass its threshold was to return to stagnation", subjected to the darkness and repetition of women's work. Whereas the "rayless cells" and the "viewless fetters" of Thornfield" are sources of her dread because they represent the lack of a "power of vision" that would connect her with wider knowledge, more varied activity and a larger world. Hence, the latent desire to dismantle such a form of repression is expressed in her

  • Word count: 861
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Through her presentation of Jane, how does Charlotte Bronte challenge conventional ideas of her time?

Through her presentation of Jane, how does Charlotte Bronte challenge conventional ideas of her time? Charlotte Bronte, through the character of Jane Eyre, challenges the conventional ideas of the Victorian era, specifically in the areas of family life, education and relationships. Victorians adhered to the vision of a very rigorous family structure, which had no room for any individuality or distinctiveness. The traditional family view was that children were supposed to obey their parents and act prudently. They should be 'seen but not heard.' Jane, however, is a rebellious child with a passionate disposition who cannot tolerate this notion and often refuses to accept her punishments. Mrs Reed does not bring up Jane the way she brings up her own spoilt children. She makes it very clear that she is doing her niece a favour as she is forced by the circumstances to keep her in her household. She treats her like a maid, and Jane is often punished; most of the times because she expresses her own opinion. For example: 'I am not deceitful; if I were, I should say I loved you, but I declare I do not love you' - page 43 Mrs Reed constantly tries to suppress any uniqueness Jane possesses and forces her to treat her cousins like royalty due to her 'low' rank. In these cases, Bessie tries to advise young Jane. An example is below: You ought not to think yourself on an equality

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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How does Bronts characterisation of Jane Eyre prepare the reader for her momentous decision in chapter 27?

How does Brontë's characterisation of Jane Eyre prepare the reader for her momentous decision in chapter 27? Jane's decision to decline Rochester's proposal to go away and live as brother and sister is momentous as she is shown to be so in love with him and wants to be with him. However because of the existence of Mr Rochester's wife everything has changed. Her final decision is one that shows Jane's true character which the reader has seen developing throughout the book. Jane is shown as strong willed and knows where she stands throughout the novel. When she has to make a decision the fact she is very strong shows the reader that even though it was a hard decision to make it was not surprising that Jane made it. This is because the reader has learnt so much about Jane's character and the way she handles different situations throughout her experiences at Gateshead, Lowood and Thornfield. Brontë portrays the events leading up to the outcome of the marriage in a similar way as we know something is going to go wrong in the marriage because of events such as Rochester being very rushed and seeming different towards Jane. When Mr. Rochester proposed to Jane, the departing of the two was strongly foreshadowed when "[the tree] had been struck by lighting... half of it split away" (Ch.23). It shows how the two will fall apart like the tree. Following this description, the truth

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Jane Eyre: A Cinderella Story The Novel Jane Eyre in several aspects can be compared to "Cinderella".

Jane Eyre: A Cinderella Story The Novel Jane Eyre in several aspects can be compared to "Cinderella". Jane is similar to Cinderella, Rochester is like Prince Charming, Mrs. Reed is like her evil step mother, Eliza and Georgiana are like the evil step sisters. Jane's life at Gateshed is like Cinderella's life at her step mother's house. When Jane was living at Thornfield, is like Cinderella when she married the prince, and was living in the palace. Mr. Rochester is like her prince charming, which takes her away from her ugly life. But Jane is there to give his ward Adele an education. That is how Mr. Rochester first falls in love with Jane when he sees the knowledge and education that Jane has. Grace Poole is like the spell that the fairy god-mother casts on Cinderella to go to the ball and then wears off at midnight. And when the spell wears off Grace tries to kill Jane because she is taking care of Bertha that is actually married to Rochester. And Grace succeeds in ruining the wedding. When Jane Eyre, she goes back to Gateshed to her Aunt Mrs. Reed's house when Mrs. Reed is dying. Is like when Cinderella marries the prince and allows the step-mother and step-sisters to work in the palace as her servant. As Cinderella, was to her step-mother and sisters when she lived with them in their house. And Jane actually kind have became friends with her cousins Eliza and

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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How does Charlotte Bronte make the reader feel sympathy for Jane Eyre in chapters one and two?

Jane Eyre is the main character from Charlotte Bronte's popular novel, "Jane Eyre." In the novel Jane Eyre, although she is poor and of plain appearance, she possesses an indomitable spirit, a sharp wit and great courage; and because of these characteristics she is a very likeable character. Like all good novels, the author tries to get the reader to like the main character and Charlotte Bronte's way of making the reader fond of Jane Eyre is by making the reader feel sympathy for her. The main part that Bronte makes the reader feel sympathy for Jane is in chapters one and two, when Jane is under the control of Mrs Reed, Jane's cruel auntie. So how does Bronte make the reader feel such sympathy for Jane? Firstly the novel explains on the opening page that Eliza, John ad Georgiana Reed were 'now clustered round their mama in the drawing-room: she lay reclined on a sofa by the fireside, and with her darlings about her looked perfectly happy.' Jane then states 'Me, she had dispensed from joining the group.' This quote immediately brings compassion to the reader for Jane, as the reader can now see that Jane is seen as an outsider in the Reed family household. Jane slipped into the small breakfast-room for a reading session in solitude, hiding away from the rest of the Reed family behind a 'red moreen curtain' in the window seat. This is when her also cruel cousin, John Reed,

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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A comparison of a pre-twentieth century and a twentieth century novel.

A comparison of a pre-twentieth century and a twentieth century novel Throughout this essay I am going to compare chapter seven of Jane Eyre with chapter eleven of To Kill A Mockingbird, bringing out any similarities of character, theme and narrative technique. Although these two novels were both written in different countries and were published nearly one hundred years apart they do share the following in common; they both have contemptible characters, admirable characters, common themes of child rearing and prejudice, and similar narrative techniques. Firstly, both chapters contain characters whom we admire and whom we condemn. In Jane Eyre, characters we admire are Jane herself, Miss Temple and Helen Burns. Jane Eyre is the eponymous hero of the novel, because of her feisty attitude and her spirited defiance. She answers back to Mrs Reed and stands up to Mr Brocklehurst in an earlier chapter and here in chapter 7 Charlotte Bronte writes: "in an impulse of fury against Reed....bounded in my pulses at the conviction." However to a Victorian audience this would have been shocking as women were viewed as the weaker gender and it was unheard of for children to be defiant. Miss Temple is another character that we admire in Jane Eyre. She is caring and concerned. This is seen when she gives the children bread and cheese instead of burnt porridge. This is somewhat admirable

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Charlotte Bronte's Style in Jane Eyre

Charlotte Bronte's Style in Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte's style of writing is distinctively her own. In her novel Jane Eyre, she writes in a style that is extraordinarily powerful and expresses quite accurately the meaning she wishes to convey. Her style of writing is characterized by a command of language, by spontaneity, by a chaste simplicity and by a felicity in the choice of words and in combing them into phrases, clauses and sentences. She uses a great deal of dialogue and has an excellent ear for the "idioms of class and age." She disliked ornamentation and the use of too many words and her style is therefore straightforward. It is, above all things, exact. The picture Charlotte Bronte draws of people and scenes are, in fact, unforgettable. Bronte indeed excels at character drawing. The beautiful Rosamond Oliver and the stately Blanch Ingram are set vividly before the reader; the bestial mad woman is shown with terrifying realism. As she excels at character drawing she also excels at scene drawing. The moorland over which Jane wonders; Hey Lane, in which she first meets Mr. Rochester ("I was a mile from Thornfield, in a lane noted for wild roses in summer, for nuts and blackberries in autumn, ... but whose best winter delight lay in its utter solitude and leafless repose"); the candle-lit room at Moor House into which the homeless Jane gazes, are all described so that

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Examine the way in which childhood perspectives are created in Jane Eyre and Hideous Kinky

Examine the way in which childhood perspectives are created in Jane Eyre and Hideous Kinky. Charlotte Bronte was born in 1816 in Hamworth in Yorkshire. Her father was the vicar of the village she lived in. Her mother died when she was very young. With her two sisters, Maria and Elizabeth she was sent to a very strict boarding school where she was very unhappy. Both her sisters died of tuberculosis, which made her very upset. Jane Eyre was based on Charlotte Bronte's own experience and is a fictional autobiography. Esther Freud was born in London in 1963 almost 150 years after Charlotte Bronte. She spent most of her childhood in Sussex, she was taken to Morocco when she was very young but says she can't remember. Hideous Kinky was published in 1992, although it's not an autobiography its base on her childhood experiences in Morocco. Jane Eyre is set in the middle of the Victorian period where children had no rights and social class was everything. As the book goes on we see Jane grow from a rebellious and boisterous young girl to a sensible and determined woman. We see Jane move from place to place meeting and losing people. Although we do see Jane growing into a young woman we are only concentrating on the first 10 chapters in which we follow her childhood. Hideous Kinky is set in the 1960's, in Morocco .The book gives a view of life on the road to Morocco is put across

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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'The Oakum Room' and 'Jane Eyre' both show women in oppressive Victorian institutions - Show how the two writers bring out the nature of those institutions and the way the women react to their situation.

The Oakum Room and Jane Eyre 'The Oakum Room' and 'Jane Eyre' both show women in oppressive Victorian institutions. Show how the two writers bring out the nature of those institutions and the way the women react to their situation. One of the texts was an extract from the novel Jane Eyre, which was written in the nineteenth century by Charlotte Bronte. On the other hand, The Oakum Room is a short story written in the 1970's by Theresa Tomlinson. The first text I read was The Oakum Room, which is a short story about the lives of homeless, used women. These women are monitored every day by very hard people with little sympathy towards the inmates. The women spend their lives in a workhouse mainly in The Oakum Room, picking oakum which is the mixture of tar and old rope, used to seal wooden boats. The women were ordered to spend all day picking all ropes to bits with their bare hands and were treated like dirt. This left them with scarred hands and it was as tough as the skin of a beast. The inmates could not leave because under the Vagrancy Laws, it was illegal to be homeless, as they wouldn't have any where to go. The story of The Oakum Room describes the working and living conditions of these women. An important part of The Oakum Room is the condition of work. We already know that the women were treated like slaves and worked, lived, ate in silence - just to show the

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Jane's Diary

Jane's Diary Dear Diary, The night before my wedding night I recall having a strange dream which "I interpreted as a warning of disaster. I feared my hopes were too bright to be realised" and now I know that what I had feared had now become true. Today was the worst day of my entire life. The one person I most truly loved in the whole world has left me with no other choice but to leave him and never return. "Mr Rochester was not to me what he had been; for he was not what I had thought him." "Real affection, it seemed, he could not have for me." "Oh, how blind had been my eyes! How weak my conduct!" When I awoke this morning "I knew not whether the day was fair or foal." Sophie came to dress me and when I looked into the mirror "I saw a robed and veiled figure, so unlike my usual self that it seemed almost the image of a stranger." Mr Rochester then took me into the dining room and said "he would give me but ten minutes to eat some breakfast." I felt as though everything was in a rush because then, "I was hurried along by a stride I could hardly follow; and to look at Mr Rochester's face was to feel that not a second of delay would be tolerated for any purpose." When we arrived at the church, I noticed "two figures of strangers straying amongst the low hillocks." I wondered who they were but in the end I assumed they were going to witness the ceremony. Mr Rochester and I

  • Word count: 1514
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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