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Does The Fact That Hamlet Does Not Carry Out His One Task Admire Him Less

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Introduction

Does The Fact That Hamlet Does Not Carry Out His One Task Admire Him Less The task that Hamlet is trying to do is to get revenge for the death of his Father, the old king over the new king, Claudius. If Hamlet did carry out his task at the start of the play it would be a very boring. While he is trying, he asks some very interesting questions and shows a great mind, which makes it very hard not to admire him. In Hamlets most famous soliloque he asks To be, or not to be, that is the question: (II i 56) Another task (which he manages to do) is the battle to keep himself from committing suicide. Here he asks the big question of 'Would it matter if I was alive or dead?'. Anybody who has walked this earth must have had to ask the very same question at some point and to a certain degree of seriousness. ...read more.

Middle

By seeing the rest of the play they might be able to form their own theories. Hamlet does not answer the issues directly but Hamlet might be able to clear the pathways so at least a start can be made. He does this in most of his soliloquies, for example (III i 56-89, IV iv 31-66). Hamlet has the chance to kill Claudius after the play, when he is praying for forgiveness in the chapel. Hamlet has the weapon, motive, urge and the timing but he still does not carry it out. I, his sole son, do this same villain send To heaven. Why, this is hire and salary, not revenge, (III iii 77-80) Hamlet is just about to do his duty to his father when he stops to think. He realises that if he were to kill Claudius while he was being redeemed he would be sent straight to heaven. ...read more.

Conclusion

This constant changing is very exciting because you never know what he might be like next. Hamlet thinks up some very odd ideas. He suddenly decides (as a first thought) that he should act mad to try to hide the fact that he was planning to murder Claudius. Though it is a very amusing idea which fills up the time exceedingly well. He also without much thought he made up his mind to re-enact his fathers death to see what Claudius' reaction was to establish if he was guilty. These are pretty radical things to plunge straight into, but Hamlet manages to somehow pull them both off almost perfectly. What I did not admire was that Hamlet might have done the task when he found out Claudius was the killer of his father. Also that he managed to not get killed by Claudius, when it could have been done at any particular point in the play. You cannot get much worse than murdering your own bother, stealing the throne and marrying the old queen/sister-in-law. Kirsty Jardine ...read more.

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