• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Dulce et Decorum Est

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Dulce et Decorum Est The poem "Dulce et Decorum Est" was written during the First World War by a soldier called Wilfred Owen. The title is Latin and means "It is Sweet and Fitting To" and is shown as ironic, as it explains throughout the poem, that there is nothing sweet or fitting about war. The poet explains the irony by use of various literary techniques. The poet himself suffered greatly during the war and, to escape shell-shock or madness, he transferred his suffering into poem form But he sadly died on on the front line on the last day of 1918. ...read more.

Middle

This changes the format of the poem from a second hand account, to his thoughts and feelings being presented in first hand. Also in the second stanza Wilfred Owen talks about his "dreams" which suggests a haunting nightmare that would remind him of all the horrors and traumas of war. In the third stanza Wilfred Owen refers to an "old lie". This term relates to the propaganda of the government and the limited information of the media which altogether creates the image that war is the right thing and that all young men should want to join the war and go to fight. ...read more.

Conclusion

This poem is also relevant in today's world and the war in Iraq because of propaganda in the media. Every day there is some form of advertising for the army and there is still not enough information about the war so Wilfred Owen's poem is still correct today in that the messages given out about war are still a "lie". The poem reveals to us the truths and the realities of war by creating an image of the horrors. The poet does this by using literary techniques like telling us the traumas of war first hand. He shows us that "Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori", It is sweet and fitting to die for one's country, is definitely an "Old Lie". ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Wilfred Owen section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a star student thought of this essay

4 star(s)

Response to the question

This is a response to a question asking about the relevance and effect of 'Dulce et Decorum est' by Wilfred Owen. Unusually, there is no comparative poem but nonetheless, the candidate responses well to the task and draws on a ...

Read full review

Response to the question

This is a response to a question asking about the relevance and effect of 'Dulce et Decorum est' by Wilfred Owen. Unusually, there is no comparative poem but nonetheless, the candidate responses well to the task and draws on a number of poetic devices from the poem to analyse. Some sections are more effective than others but this candidate can be proud of their ability to update the themes of "the old Lie" to modern day wars such as the War on Terror. The structure of the essay is fine, considering there is no comparative poem but were there one, the structure of commenting stanza-by-stanza may not be advisable. This structure however is nicely suited as we see the candidate work their way through each of the three stanzas.

Level of analysis

The Level of Analysis is fair. Parts of the analysis are more convincing than others, and some parts don't qualify even as feature-spotting because the candidate does not always provide a quote - "He also uses techniques like alliteration, still to create the image of the disgusting reality of war. (sic)" Quotes are an important part of the analysis - imagine you are writing for someone who does not know the poem. You need to pick the most important, most powerful quote that represents your points e.g. for the above example, the candidate would chose "Knock-kneed" or "Men marched asleep".
The candidate, to improve would look to consider not just the irony of the poem, but also the connotative messages the language carries. "Coughing like hags" and "like a devil's sick of sin" do a lot more than simple connect with the reader on an emotional level. They carry connotations of preternatural occurrences - a hellish description - he is likening the front-line to being trapped in Hell. Analysing the obvious will only get you so many marks, but to get higher grades and to push your essay just a little bit further out there so that the examiner reads it and becomes really impressed with how you interpret to poem is what will get you the A/A* grades.

Quality of writing

The Quality of Written Communication here is fine. Though only very few marks comparatively are available in this part, it is still of high importance to ensure the clarity of your written expression because the amount of marks available can be a large as the difference between a grade boundary sometimes. This candidate's clarity is very good and, even though they stick to short, simple sentences they use appropriate terminology where it's needed (except for mistaking "poetic techniques" for "literary techniques").


Did you find this review helpful? Join our team of reviewers and help other students learn

Reviewed by sydneyhopcroft 11/04/2012

Read less
Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Wilfred Owen essays

  1. How does Alan Bennet create sympathy for the character of Wilfredin Playing Sandwiches?

    Wilfred is also married to Janet which you definitely do not associate with paedophilic tendencies. Bennet also shows Wilfred with friends and family at a social event, a christening, which also builds on the sense that he is a normal part of society.

  2. Compare and contrast the presentation of war in Wilfred Owen's Dulce et decorum est ...

    as simple as 'flowers' or candles held in the hands of 'boys' to 'shine' soldiers 'the holly glimmers of good bye'. Their purpose and audience also largely affect the mode by which each of the writers have presented war. Wilfred Owen's main purpose of writing his poem was to discourage

  1. The Charge of the Light Brigade (TCOTLB) & Dulce ET Decorum EST (DEDE) Comparison

    In May 1917 he was near a shell explosion and was then evacuated to England in June to be treated for his 'shell-shock'. Whilst in hospital he met another poet of the time called Siegfried Sassoon. Around this time he wrote a lot of his most famous pieces.

  2. Wilfred Owens World War poetry Dulce et Decurum est and Mental Cases

    grandest of all the games, 'The Great War' as it was referred to at the time. This poem is challenging the audience to sign up to prove their masculinity, not just by labelling the War as a game, but also through a series of rhetorical questions; an example being the title of the poem, which re-occurs throughout.

  1. Dulce et Decorum Est

    Owen opens the stanza with the words "Gas! GAS!" The capital letters are important because it sets a tone of urgency and panic and makes it seem as if the author is yelling at the reader, just as the soldiers and the superiors would probably be yelling frantically.

  2. Text Transformation of "Disabled" by Wilfred Owen

    Giddiness made Taylor feel sick. Finally, the car came to a halt. With difficulty, Mark tried to lift him onto his confining chair, but failed and Taylor toppled over, sending pain shooting through his phantom limb. Without legs, he lay on the hard ground pathetically attempting to move and so he had to literally be carried and lifted into his wheelchair.

  1. Dulce et Decorum Est Poem Analysis

    what he had, he would never tell the ?old Lie? ? capitalized L personifies this phrase, as if it was something human, some evil to the point where it is not just words ? ?Dulce Et Decorum Est Pro Patria Mori? ? the completed phrase meaning ?It is sweet and

  2. Analysis of 'Dulce et Decorum Est' by Wilfred Owen

    The poet thoroughly describes the dying man through his word choice: ??Of vile, incurable sores?? Owen wants his reader to imagine the horrific significance of the word ?vile? as it relates to death.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work