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GCSE: Julius Caesar

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  • Marked by Teachers essays 6
  1. Marked by a teacher

    The Gender Transformation of Caesar

    5 star(s)

    Call it my fear." (2.2.50). Caesar agrees to this arrangement temporarily with a veiled acknowledgment of the reality- a rhetorical question relating to the fact that he is "afeard to tell the graybeards the truth" (2.2.67). Caesar then immediately displays his weak resolution when Decius easily persuades him to reverse his earlier decision, and he proceeds to greet the senators, demonstrating another hazardous trait associated with women, inconstancy. Portia similarly behaves in accession with the low expectation of women and demonstrates "how weak a thing/ The heart of woman is!"

    • Word count: 1750
  2. Marked by a teacher

    Compare Brutus and Antonys speeches in Act III Scene 2 of Julius Caesar. Analyse the dramatic effects created by Shakespeares use of language

    4 star(s)

    Using a chiasm (repeating words in a different way) makes Brutus' words more emphatic. From line 22 onwards Brutus is explaining his reasons for killing Caesar. Brutus uses memorable sentences such as: "Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more." Here Brutus is stating that he did indeed care about Caesar. However, he was prepared to sacrifice Caesar's life for the benefit of Roman citizens. Brutus maintains a consistent pattern where he presents Caesar's action and then his own reaction: "As Caesar loved me, I weep for him; as he was fortunate, I rejoice at it; as he was valiant, I honour him: but as he was ambitious, I slew him".

    • Word count: 1218
  3. Marked by a teacher

    'Antony's use of rhetoric in Act3, Scene2 is more effective than Brutus'.

    4 star(s)

    An example of pathos2 is,'...I should do Brutus wrong and Cassius wrong (who you all know) are honourable men. I will not do them wrong; I rather choose, to wrong the dead, to wrong myself and you, then to wrong such honourable men.' This quote in some ways appears at first glance to be pro-Brutus but the undertones are more malicious and if said in grief3, could evoke powerful emotional reactions from the audience which is one of Antony's main objectives, so to make the plebeians4 turn against the conspirators in their, and at the sight of Antony's grief.

    • Word count: 1187
  4. Marked by a teacher

    How is Brutus Presented as a Tragic Hero

    4 star(s)

    I believe this flaw to be the fact that he is too noble; this leads to naivety and allows him to be deceived by the other characters in the play to his downfall. He is na�ve of some of Cassius' true character even though he is his friend. He is also over trusting of Mark Antony which is clearly shown in act 3 scene 1 where he makes the mistake of allowing Antony to make a speech at Caesar's funeral, even though his fellow conspirators advise him otherwise: 'Brutus, a word with you.

    • Word count: 1205
  5. Marked by a teacher

    "The Noblest Roman of them all." How Accurate an Assessment is this of the Character Brutus?

    3 star(s)

    In trying to solve a problem, he had inadvertently created one and caused great unrest in Rome and the outer lying territories. So this raises the question, does Brutus deserve the title of "Noblest Roman of them all" or was he nothing more than a naive politician who replaced one corrupt system with another? Before the actual murder, Brutus was a great friend of his target and had not actually joined the conspiracy. He was in great favour with him but was starting to feel Caesar was going too far and getting too much power.

    • Word count: 1312
  6. Marked by a teacher

    Why is Antony a more effective speaker than Brutus?

    3 star(s)

    He is also very careful and manipulative with his speech as he makes sure that he is able to go on with it long enough to sway the public's opinion towards him. Antony effectively uses repetition in his speech. Constantly he mentions Brutus to be an 'honourable man.' By repeating Brutus to be honourable, as the plebeians are convinced he is, Antony is able to make it sound worthless as it begins to sound tiresome and so causes the plebeians to question Brutus nobility.

    • Word count: 809

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • Compare Brutus and Antonys speeches in Act III Scene 2 of Julius Caesar. Analyse the dramatic effects created by Shakespeares use of language

    "Antony decided to take with him the will sealed by Caesar. The crowd are desperate to find out what the will holds. Antony refused to do this based upon moral grounds. However he hints that Caesar's riches would have benefited the empire and its citizens since they were the heirs. This is arguably what changes and helps the crowd reach their conclusion. Brutus' speech is very direct in its addressing and relies on repetition and punchy lines to gain the audiences' support. Comparatively Antony's approach is astute and sophisticated. I believe Shakespeare has written a very engaging scene by constantly swinging the audience's support between Brutus and Antony. Christy Varghese 11 T Shakespeare Coursework (Julius Caesar) 1"

  • Discuss the main Characteristics of Julius Caesar, from Shakespeares play Julius Caesar.

    "In conclusion Caesar was portrayed as a ruthless man, desperate for power. However, he was often easily manipulated due to his arrogance and over-inflated ego. He was also very good at deceiving the common people and making them believe that he was working for the greater good when really he was just working for his own personal benefit. These were the main factors in Caesars characteristics that ultimately lead to the end of his life. These are also the main characteristics that have seemed to be passed from Caesar onto Mark Anthony, turning him into a ruthless murderer desperate for power. Stuart Stephens 11D 1"

  • Julius Caesar - Compare the speaches of Brutus and Antony.

    "Although it was Antony's appeal to the crowds emotion that ultimately swayed them to his side. In conclusion, both Brutus and Antony's speeches were very important to the drama so that their audience can see how easily manipulated the plebeians were. This enables Mark Antony to move the crowd to avenge Caesar's death through civil war and finally the suicides of Brutus and Mark Antony. ADIL ELMI Page 1 5/1/2007"

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