• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Essay Exploring the right to independence for women in Jane Eyre.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Essay Exploring the right to independence for women in Jane Eyre Independence means having the right. The right to think what you want to think. Not let any body take control of your mind, and thoughts. The right to free speech. To be able to say what you believe is right. Human rights protect the rights of people, everyone no matter sex or status. When women got the vote it was an amazing breakthrough in our history, and that slab of independence with live inside every women for years to come, like a flame that is always burning. However it was not always been that way. That flame had not always been burning. There was a time in which women were not so respected. This lives within books like Jane Eyre. Striving to alter the problems in society. During the Victorian Era, independence for women was not even thought of as important. Men dominated the lives of their wives. For an average wife, sex was thought of as a sin, shamefully committed and injured to fulfil her husband's wants, or orders. Ironically, however shameful sex was in a relationship, prostitution was common. Many Authors, battled and fought against the system, and exposed the true Victorian life for what it really was. Authors such as Charles Dickens. Who with his book Oliver Twist, shone a light on the back street life of London, and showed it for what it really was. These books tackled the harsh issues of our history, and helped shape and mould our country for the future. ...read more.

Middle

Jane was hallucinating, she was completely terror struck. 2All looked colder and darker in that visionary hollow than in reality: and the strange little figure there gazing at me, with a white face, and arms specking the gloom and glittering eyes of fear moving where all else was still, had the effect of a real spirit." She looked in the mirror. It shows her the duality of her character, her passionate, and her weak, with "glittering eyes of fear." She fainted from sheer horror of her experience. After being expelled from the festivities of Christmas cheer, "from every enjoyment I was of course, excluded." She was sent before Mr Brocklehurst, who interrogated her, about possible entry to Lowood School. "Do you say your prayers every morning?" He proved to be a vicious and un-caring man. Who on face value seemed to be a church-going, upstanding member of the society, but he was a terribly harsh, mean man. Jane rebelled against some of his questions. She refused to listen to some of his statements. She is no learning to assert herself, she is gaining more independence. However what is her strength was also her biggest weakness. Mr Brocklehusrt did not like her behaviour. Her remarks were not welcomed by him. "Psalms are not interesting" Jane said. He is a hot-tempered man, and doesn't take kindly to Jane's comments. "That proves you have a wicked heart, and you must prey to god to change it... and give you a heart of flesh." ...read more.

Conclusion

Jane had grown up a lot at Lowood School. It had built her character. Mr Rochester surprises Jane in the way that he treats her. Jane is reminded of her depression about herself when a party is held at Thornfiled. Among the guests was Blanche Ingam. A beautiful and young lady. "This beautiful an accomplished lady...as brilliant as her jewels." She was considered "the belle of the evening." Jane was rather envious of Blanche. She compared herself to her. This shows the duality of society. Jane is plain, and works hard for what she earns. Whereas Blanche is Beautiful, but has a heart "on which nothing bloomed spontaneously." She feels as though she doesn't belong, even though Mr Rochester had insisted that she and Adele were involved in the festivities. Jane became upset when the ladies started discussing the "in competency" of governesses. Blanche said "My dearest, don't mention governesses, the word makes me nervous." This shows how the higher classes view that of the lower classes. However Mr Rochester believes in treating Jane like an equal. "I don't wish to treat you like an inferior." He also says " My equal is here." Mr Rochester is symbolic of the start of independence for women. He neglects social structure, and loves on impulse. He seems not to care about material gain, and believes that marriage is not for business or family gain, but purely for love. This is Bronte's way of showing the Victorian society the love is more important, and that poverty is nothing to be afraid of. After all that Jane has been through, she does indeed fall in love with Mr Rochester. This truly does show that love conquers all. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Charlotte Bronte section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Charlotte Bronte essays

  1. EXAMINE THE SIGNIFICANCE OF JANE EYRE'S RELATIONSHIP WITH HELEN BURNS

    "When, having done speaking, she breathed a little fast, and coughed a short coughed, I momentarily forgot my own sorrows to yield to a vague concern for her" This shows the reader that Jane is aware that Helen is not well, however she does not realize how ill Helen in actual fact was.

  2. Jane Eyre Essay

    It seems as if Grace Poole is almost haunting Jane when she is in the house on her own. Jane is intrigued by Rochester and suspense is built up to when Jane meets him because of the things that Jane has heard about Rochester.

  1. Jane Eyre - Was she a woman of her times?

    "What was I to do...I experienced an ordeal, a hand of fiery iron, full of struggle blackness, burning! Not a human being that ever lived could wish to be loved better than I was loved; and him who loved me I absolutely worshipped: and I must renounce love and idol."

  2. The Real Charlotte - review

    Charlotte then knows that she has enough information to successfully begin her revenge on Roddy, as she continues to push Francie and Hawkins together, by every means at her disposal. When they go to Bruff, Charlotte makes certain to attract to Christopher, so that Hawkins and Francie are left alone,

  1. Describe the changes that took place in Jane Eyre's life when she moved from ...

    Mrs.Reed didn't really appreciate it but at least Jane felt she had done the right thing. Sadly Mrs.Reed passed away. This is when Jane came in contact with her real family a truly amazing miracle that couldn't have made Jane's life any better.

  2. Charlotte Brontë presents several different images of women in Jane Eyre- discuss these with ...

    However she has no inner beauty unlike Helen, Miss Temple and Jane as she is always making harsh and rude comments. She blesses, but again superficially, because she is such a superficial character.

  1. Analyse the ways in which Bronte presents the "wedding" of Jane and Rochester and ...

    The fact that she "collects" her feelings as if they are objects is very unusual. A typical bride would be distraught and act and do things very differently; it is very stereotypical for the bride to faint. She decides not to show any rush of feelings or "swoon" because she sees it as a "danger" and bottles everything up.

  2. Attitudes assignment- a class divided. Social Experiment in a primary school class to ...

    This exercise won't work without your cooperation. Blue-eyed people aren't allowed to smoke; blue-eyed people aren't allowed to sit in these empty chairs. Do not let a blue-eyed person sit next to you. You know you can't trust them and besides which they don't smell good. Everybody knows that about blue-eyed people.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work