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Explain the emergence and rise of the beast in Lord of the flies by William Golding

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Introduction

Explain the emergence and rise of the beast in Lord of the flies by William Golding: Introduction (1911 - 1993) Golding wrote Lord of the Flies shortly after learning of the horrors of World War II and the Holocaust. Here is some information about him. He was born in 1911 at Saint Columb Minor in Cornwall, England, Sir William Gerald Golding was educated at the Marlborough Grammar School, where his father taught, and later at Brasenose College, Oxford. Although educated to be a scientist at the wishes of his father, he soon developed a great interest in literature, becoming first devoted to Anglo-Saxon and then writing poetry. At Oxford he studied English literature and philosophy. Following a short period of time in which he worked at a settlement house and in small theatre companies as both an actor and a writer, Golding became a schoolmaster at Bishop Wordsworth's School in Salisbury. During the Second World War he joined the Royal Navy and was involved in the sinking of the German battleship Bismarck, but following the war he returned to Bishop Wordsworth's School, where he taught until the early sixties. In 1954, Golding published his first novel, Lord of the Flies, which details the adventures of British schoolboys stranded on an island in the Pacific who descend into barbaric behaviour. ...read more.

Middle

At the same time it is obvious that Golding uses the early chapters in the book to set the scene for the chaos and terror of the beast that follows. Soon it became evident that even the older boys had begun to wonder whether in fact some kind of beast was on the island. However nobody was willing to admit this, but the fact that many boys now cried out in their sleep or had terrible nightmares, shows that they were all fearful of a beast. The first signs of evil started when Jack* and his hunters killed a pig and re-enacted the killing. In the process people were injured and the chanting, which was to become a ritual, began at this time. Although Jack's ambition to kill a pig had been fulfilled, he now had a taste of the glory and sense of self-fulfillment it brought him. This meant that he was by no means happy to have killed one pig, but would instead wanted continue to do so. It is significant that Jack felt it was necessary to kill pigs, seeing that there was already a viable supply of food on the island. It is possible that Jack simply wanted to kill pigs because the evil inside him had begun to emerge and introduced his lust for killing. ...read more.

Conclusion

Ralph was hunted down like a wild animal and the imagery Golding uses in this final chapter describes a world where insanity and evil rule. There is also the possibility that the boys now saw Ralph as the beast, which is why they hunted him down. Secondly, although all the boys were hunting Ralph to kill him, most of them probably did not realize what they were doing or why, due to the evil that taken over them. This is because Jack had influenced their minds and half of them probably saw killing Ralph as merely a game. In view of the fact that Ralph was being hunted down by everyone on the island, he would have been probably killed had it not been for the arrival of the Navy officers. Golding does not choose to allow Ralph to be killed. This could be because he does not wish to allow evil to win. However, whether the boys would be able to lead a normal life after their experience on the island is doubtful. The fact that the boys used the beast to avoid self-knowledge and the evil inside themselves is clearly evident at the end of the novel, when they all begin to cry at the realization of what they have done. Finally, it is important to realize that the only reason they attain self-knowledge is because of the arrival of an adult figure on the island, which allows law and order to be restored, thereby eliminating the evil. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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