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Explore how Dickens makes his readers aware of the important role of children and family life in 'A Christmas Carol'.

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Introduction

Charles Dickens writing has had a colossal influence on millions of people by using what Victorian London and major cities of time were like. Through his novels he campaigned for the poor. Charles Dickens' childhood was blighted by his father's financial problems but by the end he was lecturing about his works to large and enthusiastic audiences. Driven by a need to separate himself from early poverty and by a desire to help those children who were as poor as he had been. Charles Dickens was born on Friday, February 7th 1812 at No. 1 Mile End Terrace, Landport; when the Industrial Revolution was gathering pace. As Charles Dickens grew up many large family groups living in villages were breaking up and moving to towns either singly or as nuclear families. Perhaps Dickens had a fear of the breaking up of the family group in the changing times. The bond of the family is shown for example when the Cratchits gather at Christmas; phrases like "Bob hugged his daughter to his hearts content." are used. At age of 12 Dickens was removed from school and sent to work in a boot-blacking factory earning six shillings a week to help support the family. ...read more.

Middle

A few pages deeper into stave 2 Scrooge is taken back to his childhood by the Ghost of Christmas Past and sees all of his childhood friends and remembers the road they are on. The Ghost asks if Scrooge recollects where they are and Scrooge's reply is a surprise "I could walk it blindfold said Scrooge" "strange to have forgotten it for so many years! Replied the Spirit" Scrooge had blocked out his childhood because it was a sad and poor time for him. Scrooge was seeing "these boys were in great spirits". This implies that children represent joy and have appreciation for life making everything happy. Scrooge was thinking that he had watched these boys but had never been one himself. He was the "solitary child, neglected by his friends". The importance and affection of families is shown when his sister takes him home. Also the joy of children is shown. As she is "bending down to laugh" she talks of, home being quote "home's like heaven". An important figure in the story is his sister a child who Scrooge has affection for in his memory, this laughter pops up again. ...read more.

Conclusion

"Tell me what man that was whom we saw lying dead?" This then leads to a demonstration by the spirit of Christmas yet to come of Scrooges own death, this part of the text increases Scrooges realization of the significance of Tiny Tim's death. Throughout the story, Scrooge has numerous warnings of his future from the people he meets, his nephew, Marley, the spirits, Belle etc. Although from the beginning of his acquaintance with the first Ghost, Scrooge's gradual change is clearly perceptible, it is the spectacle of his own death, which makes him realize he must change his ways. On Christmas morning Scrooge wakes up and is cheerful. "I am as happy as an angel" Scrooge has 'Christmas fever' and acts as if he was a child, he becomes generous sending Bob Crachit the prized turkey and promising the boy half a crown for buying the turkey. Does this show the sort of attitude Dickens's wants in society? The end of the novel contrasts well with the beginning. The story has a very typical fairy tale ending and a clear moral to the story. Scrooge has under gone a metamorphosis. Does Scrooge's change symbolize the change in society that Dickens wanted?. Tiny Tim will live and so will everyone else, happily ever after. By Thomas Bailey 10CHB English Coursework 5/8/2007 By Thomas Bailey 10CHB English Coursework ...read more.

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