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Explore the ways in which Hardy has tried to make You sympathetic for these two female Characters

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Introduction

Explore the ways in which Hardy has tried to make You sympathetic for these two female Characters Thomas Hardy has cleverly and subtly used many different ways in writing to create an image of sympathy for the two female characters Sophy Twycott and Phyllis Grove. He uses powerful emotive Language and describes relationships and the reactions to help bring sympathy to the character. He also brings into both stories the society of the character. Hardy also tried to make you sympathise with the character by bringing in physical description, setting and plot. My piece will show you how he did this. The setting was described carefully and purposely so you would sympathise with Sophy Twycott. She lives all on her own in a semi-detached house 'in the same long straight road...stretching her eyes far up and down the vista of sooty trees, hazy air and drab house facades along which echoed the noises common to a suburban main through fare'. The way he's described it makes it sound like a typical dirty industrial town, and makes it sound so plain and boring. Its described like an endless place which she has no effect on, a place where she doesn't fit in. Which is exactly what is happening he's just said it in a different way. 'The fragment of lawn in front', I think is saying how much control she's got left in the world. ...read more.

Middle

It says that the only reason Sophy is living is to keep the house open for her son so he's always got somewhere to go. This also makes you sympathise for Sophy greatly because she is living a horrible life for someone else. Deep down she still loves her son whereas Randolph regards her as 'a mother who mistakes and origin it was a painful lot as a gentleman to blush for.' The part, which I think, gets the most sympathy for Sophy is when Randolph forces her to swear in front of his little shrine for god to not marry Sam Hobson. 'There bade her kneel, and swear that she would not wed Samuel Hobson'. His treatment towards his mother seems petty how he forces a lame woman to swear in front of his in little shrine. It is also cruel and inhumane. He forces her to sacrifice potential happiness so his place in society wont be ruined. It goes back to fate and destiny again and you know now she lives a very depressive unhappy life, this makes you extremely sympathetic. It is also ironic that behaves in this form is going to become a priest. It is almost a mockery of the church. He has done this I think because he used to be very religious and then lost it so he might be getting his own back on problems in his own life. ...read more.

Conclusion

When he does not return from Bath you sympathetic towards her because you think her love life is falling to pieces. In my opinion both Sophy and Phyllis are too honourable to their promises and that what made their downfall. When Humphery Gould makes his confession to Phyllis it is petty this gives even more sympathy. Throughout the character of Humphery Gould Thomas Hardy is criticising the lack of morals of the upper classes. Also in both female characters they don't fit into the upper classes they're both country girls Also Matthaus Tina brings sympathy towards Phyllis Grove by wanting Phyllis Grove to make the biggest decision in her life to run away with him or not. This brings much Sympathy to Phyllis. This scheme she did not like 'almost appalled her'. His death is very tragic and brings even more sympathy because she has just lost a loved one. Its almost showing how Hardy thinks society doesn't accept dissent some one who is a bit different. In both stories the female Characters end up with nothing in their lives. Both Phyllis and Sophy had very male dominated lives. In the last sentence of the Melancholy Hussar 'still recollect where the soldiers lie, Phyllis lies near'. It adds a sense of finality and hopelessness and gives you the last bit of sympathy for Phyllis. I conclude the many examples I have discussed and analysed above, in which Thomas Hardy has portrayed the female characters illustrates the effective way he has created sympathy for them in the mind of the reader. ...read more.

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