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Great Expectations - How does Dickens create characters that are both memorable and striking? Make sure you refer to at least three.

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Introduction

How does Dickens create characters that are both memorable and striking? Make sure you refer to at least three. Dickens has many ways of making his characters both striking and memorable, he uses the dialogue and blends it with the setting and social background as illustrated by 'torn by briars; who limped'. Dickens is very descriptive; this also helps making the character real. Dickens creates a creepy mood when we are told about the graveyard in which we meet Magwitch as shown by 'as if he were eluding the hands of dead people'. He uses the graveyard and the gibbet in the distance to help create this mood which adds to the edgy atmosphere. The tone of this extract is dramatic and intimidating; Dickens achieves this by using short, but descriptive sentences. Dickens makes us feel sorry for Magwitch because of the way he speaks, 'wittles' and 'pecoolier' are examples of this. As Magwitch talks to Pip, we, as the reader notice that Magwitch talks to Pip as a child and uses language that would only scare a child : 'you little devil, or I'll cut your throat!'. ...read more.

Middle

Wemmick likes to be secure; a lot of his possessions and his house, or 'castle' show this. When Dickens describes Magwitch, he describes him to look mean and scary; this is because it is Pip telling us from when he was a boy. Dickens tries to make the reader feel a bit sorry for Magwitch because he is soaked, has torn clothes and is limping. Miss Havisham is misunderstood when we first see her, as, under first impressions, Pip thinks it is a nice, clean place. Dickens slowly reveals that all is not as it seems and that actually the place is dust filled and hasn't seen sunlight in a long time, 'faded and yellow'. Dickens shows us Mrs Havisham as a beautiful woman in a brides dress at first, and then, slowly, we realise that in fact Miss Havisham is aged and worn: 'had been white long ago'. Wemmick is a very memorable because we can imagine him as a real person. Dickens makes it so the reader likes Wemmick, because he is a jolly and different type of person. ...read more.

Conclusion

His speech shows that he is working class and does not have the upper-class tone that Miss Havisham's does. Magwitch's background is working class; he is poor and has been in prison. Prisons of the 19th century were horrible places to be; they carried lots of diseases and were extremely unhygienic. Miss Havisham is from an upper class background. She is very wealthy, however remains unmarried. Marriage for women in those days was more important than it is today because it used to be the men making all the money while the women looked after the house; however Miss Havisham has plenty of money so her problem is that she is lonely. Wemmick is in the working class and works in the prison as a clerk, the conditions of prisons in those days was very bad, which may be the reason why he keeps his home life and work life completely separate. Dickens achieves making his characters both striking and memorable by describing them in heavy detail, but not making it boring by having too much. In my opinion Wemmick is the most memorable character as I could imagine him being real. ...read more.

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