• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

He is a man "more sinned against than sinning".Discuss with relation to the character of Othello.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

He is a man "more sinned against than sinning". Discuss with relation to the character of Othello. As the play progresses, Othello's character goes through many changes which happen as a result of him falling victim to Iago's evil schemes. At first he is introduced as an army general who is respected for what he does but still discriminated against for being black. Othello is a victim to racism throughout the play. He is often referred to as "the Moor" even by his beloved Desdemona and is also called by more offensive terms. Iago uses animal imagery in referring to Othello as an "old black ram". The use of animal imagery degrades Othello and use of the word "black" implies that black people were thought to be as low as animals. Emilia also calls Othello "the blacker devil" which is certainly a racist term; however, under the circumstances in which it was used she had fair reason to insult him. ...read more.

Middle

He tells Othello to "beware of jealousy" and "the green eyed monster" and echoes Brabantio's words of Desdemona having "deceived her father" and in order to make sure his 'poison' has sunk in he repeatedly says that he fears he has upset Othello's mood. "I see this hath a little dashed your spirits", "I 'faith, I fear it has" and "My lord I see you're moved". In doing so Othello's character starts to change for the worse. Moreover, Iago sins against Desdemona and Cassio by degrading them in Othello's eye and as he does so he hurts Othello. Iago says that in sleep he heard Cassio say "Sweet Desdemona let us be wary, let us hide our love" and states that Cassio "laid his leg over his thigh and sighed, and kissed, and then cried 'Cursed fate that gave thee to the Moor'". This causes Othello to be overrun with jealousy and anger and to no longer think clearly. ...read more.

Conclusion

He also realizes that he has changed and is no longer the man he once was as he says "he that was Othello" when he is referring to the murder of Desdemona. He wants to be remembered as the noble warrior Othello, who served the state and whose fault was loving too much, and who was na�ve in love; "Then you must speak of one that loved not wisely, but too well, of one not easily jealous". If one can be blamed for loving someone, trusting them and seeing the best in people, then Othello is guilty and the villain, but this is not a fault and Othello is therefore the victim. Othello contributed to his own downfall, but it was all instigated by evil Iago. He used Othello's trusting nature for his own means. It is Iago's fault that many lives were lost and that Othello felt the need to sacrifice Desdemona. Therefore, I think Othello was more sinned against than sinning and it was Iago who sinned against him most. Jade Okba IB1 English SL Teacher: Chris Perkins ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Othello section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a star student thought of this essay

3 star(s)

Response to the question

This essay responds to the task well. I personally interpret the quote as a claim that Othello's tragedy is caused by someone else, and this is the argument that this essay follows. I would note that there is not nearly ...

Read full review

Response to the question

This essay responds to the task well. I personally interpret the quote as a claim that Othello's tragedy is caused by someone else, and this is the argument that this essay follows. I would note that there is not nearly enough analysis in this essay to reach the top marks. There needs to be close analysis of Iago's soliloquies and the change in Othello's language to prove that Iago causes his downfall. There is no discussion of audience response here, and so this essay cannot reach the top marks.

Level of analysis

The analysis here is average. There is good knowledge of the play, with the essay being able to build an argument based on Iago's instigation of Othello's tragedy. However, despite the good use of quotations in this essay, none are analysed. There needs to be analysis of language, form and structure throughout to reach the top marks. I would be looking at the recurring metaphors used, or the imagery used by Iago which poisons Othello's mind. Then, once you have analysed these techniques, you can draw upon why Shakespeare has used them. There is a distinct lack of this here, and I would note that this is the most common downfall of GCSE essays. Students think that essays with good knowledge of the play will gain the top marks, but if there's no analysis then this won't happen. Without having an appreciation and exploration of the audience response, and how Shakespeare's techniques and craft affects this, you will not be given much credit. I would also note that this essay refers to characters as if they make their own choices. It is crucial that you show awareness that Shakespeare has constructed Othello, and chooses how to have him react on stage for dramatic effect. Once you get past this barrier, it'll become more natural to discuss why he has chosen to construct the play and its plot.

Quality of writing

The essay has an okay structure. There is a clear introduction, but it doesn't really set up an argument. I would be making it clear that I am arguing that Othello's tragedy is caused by Iago here, rather than taking a while to make it to that point. The conclusion is fine, but as mentioned above there is no analysis of why Shakespeare uses this fact. There needs to be a discussion of the audience response and the effect on the play's receptions. Some of the ideas are a bit dotted about, also, with paragraphs being split when they should be put together to form a more concrete point. Ensuring you have a concise structure will allow your argument to flow. Paragraphs should never be one sentence, as it shows the inability to structure a good argument - a marking point at GCSE.


Did you find this review helpful? Join our team of reviewers and help other students learn

Reviewed by groat 03/04/2012

Read less
Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Othello essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    How and why does Othello's character change during the course of the play? How ...

    4 star(s)

    However, Iago wants revenge on Cassio because he took Iago's place as Othello's lieutenant, so he tells the story in favour of Roderigo. Iago relates it in such a fashion that Othello is forced to remove Cassio of his office, "Cassio, I love thee, but nevermore be officer of mine."

  2. Marked by a teacher

    How does Shakespeare use language and stagecraft to show Othello's changing feelings towards Dedemona ...

    4 star(s)

    that she no longer loves him, and perhaps doesn't want her to kiss him back, thinking that she had once been kissing Cassio. If her kiss had felt no different than normal, how would he know whether she had ever loved him, and if it felt different, he would be sure that she wished she were kissing Cassio.

  1. Is Othello a 'noble hero' brought down by 'a devil of motiveless malignity' or ...

    appreciate what an amazing amount of cunning and patience this would've taken to pull off. In the end, Iago's last words perhaps best suit the play. "What you know, you know." Everything is presented for the entire world to see, with little hidden meanings to things and actions.

  2. How and why does Othello's language change over the course of the Play?

    villainous secrets; and yet she'll kneel and pray; I have seen her do't." Othello now can only conceive his wife as a "Whore". When he is left alone with Desdemona she immediately senses something is wrong "I understand a fury in your words, but not the words themselves."

  1. Free essay

    Othello English Coursework

    says how he has claimed Desdemona with his stories of bravery in wars and of such. "Of my whole course of: what drugs, what charms" this is him saying that he has not used any witchcraft in claiming Brabantio's daughter Desdemona.

  2. Who is responsible for Othello's downfall?

    He argued that Othello is responsible for his own downfall, and that Iago is merely a subordinate character and not the main reason for the tragedy. This view is certainly worth considering as T.S. Eliot also criticises Othello, accusing him of 'self-dramatisation, a terrible exposure of human weakness'.

  1. What extent does racism contribute to Othello's downfall?

    Throughout this course many innocent people seems to suffer. At the end he makes the audience feel pity and a sense of wastage. Othello is a general and a hero, many people consider Othello to be a hero but others such as Iago and Roderigo who are jealous of the power and respect shown to him despite his colour.

  2. Othello - Examine the importance and effectiveness of Act III, scene 3, considering the ...

    story of Cassio's sleep talking, saying to Othello that Cassio was talking about how much he loved Desdemona in his sleep, and also how he sees it a cursed fate that she belongs to Othello: "Cursed fate that gave thee to the Moor."

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work