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How does Bennett create sympathy for Doris?

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Introduction

How does Bennett create sympathy for Doris? A monologue is one person speaking their thoughts aloud or directly addressing a reader or audience. 'Talking Heads' is a series of monologues written by Alan Bennett; it was first aired on the BBC in 1987. 'A Cream Cracker under the Settee' is a monologue about a 75 year old woman called Doris played by Thora Hird who likes to keep her home well kept but the lady who comes to help clean her house, Zulema, does not seem to be doing a great job. The care home that she dislikes may be the only place left for her, but it seems that she would rather die. In this monologue Bennett creates sympathy for Doris is many ways. Doris is a frail old woman who lives on her own. She has "a pacemaker and dizzy spells". In the monologue she falls off a buffet as she is trying to dust. At the beginning of the story all she says is that "It's such a silly thing to have done" and then does not talk about it again until later on. ...read more.

Middle

Minicabs? 'Your roof repaired'?" The post turns out to be a leaflet advertising a carpet sale at the chapel. She only gets bills and advertisements, which shows that she is lonely. Throughout the monologue Doris is waiting for somebody to come and help her but nobody apart from a policeman at the end actually talked to her and she has no "Bona Fide" visitors coming to see her personally she doesn't have anybody coming who actually comes to see her. Doris feels that she can no longer fit into society. Throughout the monologue Doris keeps going back to her past and talking about her baby that didn't get born when she had a miscarriage. They bought a pram and then didn't have the baby "You were proud of your pram...At that price, Doris? This is the chance of a lifetime". Wilfred is always thinking up plans and looking to the future. Wilfred had a lot of unfulfilled plans. He wanted to get a dog but "we never got one either." "We can be self-sufficient in the vegetable department...Never materialised." ...read more.

Conclusion

Doris after her accident spends most of her time "sitting on the floor" very helpless. It shows that she takes a long time to move from one place too another because of her accident by the change in time of day at one point it is the middle of the day when she is lying by the door and then there is a pause and she is on the armchair but it is dark outside which shows that she has taken along to get there. When she is lying by the door she is sitting under the letter box and a leaflet falls on her head. She closes her eyes which shows that she is tired and in pain. Doris uses colloquial language throughout the monologue like "nought" and "buffet" rather than formal the monologue is very conversational. The good acting skills in this monologue help it work. Although I prefer other ways of telling a story I still think that it works quite well. In a Monologue the relationship between the actor and the audience is very personal; you feel that the actor is talking directly to you. In the end it seems that she has given up, she would rather die than go to Stafford house ?? ?? ?? ?? Jonny O'Brien 10DO ...read more.

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