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How does Chapter Thirty Eight in "Jane Eyre" relate to the rest of the issues raised in the novel?

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Introduction

10th December 2002. How does Chapter Thirty Eight in "Jane Eyre" relate to the rest of the issues raised in the novel? Charlotte Bronte was born in Haworth, West Yorkshire in 1820. She had five brothers and sisters. Her father was the rector of the local church. Her mother, Mariah, died in 1821 so her aunt Elizabeth Branwell came to look after the children. The girls went to "The Clergy Daughter's School". This was her model for Lowood Institution. Every morning they would rise early for one and a half hours prayer before breakfast. They would also have to spend one hour outside per day, come sun or snow. Soon at the age of ten or eleven her sisters Mariah and Elizabeth died from Tuberculoses. After their death, the remaining girls were moved from the school for a home education. They were soon found places at Roe Head School nearby. Charlotte later became famous in her own lifetime. Writing made her financially independent. Similarly to Jane Eyre, this was an achievement for women in the nineteenth century. Jane Eyre has used many of her own experiences to base the novel on, for example her experiences at school were similar to the ones described in Lowood School. Chapter thirty-eight concludes the book by expressing how Jane has changed throughout her life. ...read more.

Middle

Rochester offered her a chance to liberate her passions. She refused to be Mr. Rochester's mistress whilst Bertha was alive for she would be sacrificing her dignity and integrity. Throughout her search for freedom in the novel, she struggles to decide what type of freedom she wishes to have. Although the type of liberation St. John offered to her was what she could not have with Mr. Rochester, she would have to have stifled her true feelings by marrying St. John. She chose Mr. Rochester in the end because when Bertha was dead, she then could legally marry Mr. Rochester and she found the freedom she had longed for. Up until the final chapter Jane could be seen as plain, especially in the century the book was written in, but the final chapter reveals her more feminine side. This side of her has been waiting to be uncovered for a long time but now that she has freedom she can expose it without risk of losing her job, education or even her home. This is because she now has the financial support to not worry how people may think of her. She can now afford more frivolous garments and possessions which although she has never needed them, she now has the freedom to do so without having to restrain herself due to financial worries or people such as the beautiful, arrogant Blanche Ingram who would frown upon her to dress above her status. ...read more.

Conclusion

Love wise, both thought the other was wrong and to discuss it would have left them in dispute. As St. John died at an early age it was best they remained in harmony. If he had died and they resented each other then this would leave Jane's moral side unhappy for she could not express regret to him, as happened with Mrs. Reed. Although she hated Mrs. Reed it hurt her a great deal to have her die hating Jane. St. John's death is the second close death she has had to deal with and she wanted to leave St. John on a good note so she could have piece of mind. This may have been why she did not discuss marriage with St. John. This is why the first thoughts of the reader after reading this, may be discontented, it was the best thing for Jane to finish her relationship with St. John with. She may have used him as the final subject of the book so that the reader had time to ponder over him and realise how she wanted to end her relationship with him. This book was a major breakthrough in the nineteenth century because it dealt with women's independence and would have broadened the minds of a reader in that century. It was a book that made people, especially men, see that women had a lot more astuteness than were previously perceived to have. Ursula Donnelly 10L/E ...read more.

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