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How does Charlotte Bronte depict Jane Eyre(TM)s childhood through the first four chapters

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Introduction

How does Charlotte Bronte depict Jane Eyre's childhood through the first four chapters Jane Eyre was written by Charlotte Bronte in 1847. It was first published as an autobiography under the pseudonym Currer Bell and immediately became a big success. Charlotte Bronte originally had to write her novel under a pseudonym because women were not allowed to publish books at that time as women had a lower status than men did. This is mirrored throughout the book, for example, John Reed had complete control over Jane and other girls and women of Gateshead hall. This leads on to how women were treated in the Victorian times; women did not have any rights over men and were not in any way independent. Jane Eyre is a bildungsroman. This means that the book Jane Eyre concentrates on the spiritual, moral, psychological, social development and growth of Jane Eyre from girl to adulthood. On this long and arduous journey, the main character must feel some loss or discontent at a young age that forces her to embark on this journey. In Victorian times, adults believed that children should be seen but not heard. A prime example of this is when Jane worked as a governess of Adele at Mr Rochester's house. Whenever Mr Rochester has guests at his mansion; his guests made remarks and comments about Adele's actions. ...read more.

Middle

Jane's isolation has resulted in Jane creating replacements for the love and companionship she needs, "With Bewick on my knee, I was happy: happy at least in my way." From this quote the reader recognises that Jane has created imaginary friends in the books that she reads. By repeating the word "happy", Jane shows that she feels overjoyed with her so called companion. In addition, by personifying the book by referring to it by "Bewick", Jane emphasises that she has no friends or anyone to love her. In the depressing early stages of Jane Eyre's life, Bronte informs the reader of how the red room haunts Jane. The red room's quietness provokes an eery atmosphere, "very seldom slept in." Jane's description of the red room illustrates to the reader that the red room is very rarely used and very quiet. In addition, Jane's depiction of the colours used in the red room creates a dark and heavy ambience, "deep red damask." The reader notifies from Jane's portrayal of the red room's colours that the red room holds dark and gothic qualities. The word "deep" highlights how rich and gothic the colours are in the red room. These qualities further emphasise the eery atmosphere created by the silence. Furthermore, the furniture in the red room engulfs Jane, "A bed supported on massive pillars of mahogany." Yet again the reader recognises in this quote the sinister atmosphere being created. ...read more.

Conclusion

This quote shows the reader that Mrs Reed has told her children to keep away from Jane. This shows the Reed family has restrained Jane from their normal lives. Jane's passion is shown when she argues with Mrs Reed, "I am not deceitful: if I were, I should say I loved you; but I declare I do not love you: I dislike you the worst of anybody in the world except John Reed; and this book about the liar, you may give to your girl, Georgiana, for it is she who tells lies, and not I." Jane's passion is shown considerably in this quote because she does not burst out in anger; she controls her language and undermines Mrs Reed cleverly. Reading on, the reader finds out that Jane has won the argument with the quote, "I was left there alone--winner of the field." This shows she has controlled her passionate anger and has won the argument with Mrs Reed using language and not violence. Conclusively, Charlotte Bronte has successfully portrayed Jane Eyre's childhood to be very miserable; by using first person, Charlotte Bronte tells the story in the eyes of Jane and further emphasises how dismal Jane's childhood was. In addition, by using first person, Charlotte Bronte emphasises the struggle that Jane goes through. This struggle builds Jane's character up so that she is hardened for whatever the rest of her life throws at her. ?? ?? ?? ?? - 1 - ...read more.

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