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How does Charlotte Bronte prepare us for a change in Jane's life in chapter 12 of Jane Eyre?

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Introduction

How does Charlotte Bronte prepare us for a change in Jane's life in chapter 12 of Jane Eyre? Jane Eyre is a famous novel written by English writer Charlotte Bronte and was published in England in 1847 by Smith, Elder & Co. The Victorian era was a time period plagued with problems of inequalities, symbolism and independence between men and women, in this novel Charlotte Bronte uses Jane Eyre as a mouthpiece in order to express her views on such elements. The novel is about an orphan named Jane Eyre; Charlotte Bronte takes us on an incredible journey through which we see Jane Eyre's life in the Victorian era. Bronte uses thrilling and descriptive language to clearly describe Jane Eyre's tragic journey. Growing up she has a sad life, from the death of her parents to her abusive and horrendous & unfair treatment from Mrs. Reed or John Reed. Jane's tolerance of change begins very early in the novel and helps her in developing a strong sense of independence. When she moves to Lowood institute, she almost lives in a state of poverty, rationed food and poor accommodation, yet when she moves to Thornfield institute and is appointed as a governess, she meets Mr. Rochester and her life takes a rapid turn. Bronte uses many authorial techniques such as prophetic fallacy and imagery to convey her characters feelings; she also uses techniques such as first person narration to indulge us into her Victorian novel. In this essay I will explore how Bronte prepares us for a change in Jane's life in chapter twelve. "The promise of a smooth career, which my first calm introduction to Thornfield Hall seemed to pledge, was not belied on a longer acquaintance with the place and its inmates." ...read more.

Middle

The change in atmosphere as Jane hears the noise could represent the change in her life when she meets Rochester. Bronte uses juxtaposition to emphasize the change that Jane is about to face in her life, the juxtaposition here is the calm atmosphere and the noise that breaks the calm. The calm represents Jane's boredom, and the noise that breaks the calm represents Mr Rochester, who is about to meet Jane and change her boring life. Bronte uses fine descriptive language to show how the noise has broken the calm and peace, she describes some of the noises that Jane hears in such way that almost the reader can hear it, 'the fine rippling and whispering' is an example of this technique, also 'a metallic clatter', we get the imagery of two pieces of metal hitting each other, we can almost hear the disturbing noise created by this. Rochester is riding on his steed when it slips on some ice on the floor; he is accompanied by a dog, who Jane mistakes for a 'gytrash', a mythical character from one of Bessie's tales, Bronte creates a mystic and scary atmosphere when Jane remembers Bessie's tale in which the 'gytrash', a north of England spirit took the form of a horse, mule or a large dog, and haunted belated travellers. Bronte adds elements such as the sudden 'rush under the hedge', to create suspense and add to the eerie atmosphere, from Jane's tone of voice we can tell that she is scared, as she believes that Bessie's tale is coming to life. Her fear soon breaks as the gytrash like dog passes her, and is followed by Mr Rochester on his steed, for she knew that the gytrash travelled on his own. ...read more.

Conclusion

We can tell that Jane is in some sort of shock, maybe even excitement and is asking herself many questions as to why Mr Rochester did not introduce himself, as she dramatically exits the scene by going upstairs to get changed. Bronte does not express Jane's feelings; I believe she does this so that she could indulge us more into her novel; she wants us to answer the questions that Jane is asking herself in her mind. In chapter twelve we do not get a chance to know exactly why Mr Rochester did what he did, because Jane does not go to see him, so we are left to answer this. As I answer this question myself, I can tell that Jane will encounter a change in her life. My own interpretation as to why Mr Rochester did what he did is that maybe he fell for Jane's kindness, and unnoticed beauty, he admired her but was not sure what she thought of him. When he knew that Jane was from Thornfield, he realised that he had a chance to find out what Jane thought of him. When he learns that Jane has not met Mr Rochester (himself), he probably thought that he'd surprise her by meeting her at Thornfield hall, where he'd tell her that he is in fact the master, and that he admires her. If my interpretation to the situation is true, then Jane does not know but she will expect a change in life soon. Throughout this chapter Bronte prepares us for a change in Jane's life by using elements such as creating a scene using imagery and then dramatically changing it. Bronte uses such techniques that only we get the idea that a change is to come, but not Jane herself. ?? ?? ?? ?? Afzol Ahmed- Jane Eyre 1/6 ...read more.

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