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How does Dickens create character that both memorable and striking in ''Great Expectations''?

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Introduction

How does Dickens create character that both memorable and striking in ''Great Expectations''? Charles Dickens is a very well known writer from the Victorian period and wrote many of novels which are striking and memorable. Such ''Great Expectations'', ''Oliver twist'', ''A tale of two cities'' and ''A Christmas Carol''. When Dickens was a young boy and was a member of the working class, he had to work in a factory's as his parent's had been sent to debtor's prison. But then he worked his way up to become a law clerk. Dickens links his life to most of his novels such as ''Oliver twist'' and ''Great Expectations'' where he bases himself as the protagonist who means the main character/participants in a story or event. There are many characters that are memorable and stinking in Charles Dickens ''Great Expectations'' three of which are convict, Miss Havisham and Estella. ...read more.

Middle

In the middle of the novel pip gets a secret benefactor who pip thinks that It is Miss Havisham because she is very rich and has lots of jewellery but It is really convict. But his real name is Magwitch. Dickens tries s to make Magwitch a secret characters witch makes him more memorable and striking this you find out later in the novel. Another memorable and striking character in Charles Dickens ''Great Expectations'' is Miss Havisham. When pip goes and sees Miss Havisham At Satis house is dark and the windows have all been boarded up this shows how sad Miss Havisham is. It is like she has lock herself in the house because she was going to get married to Compeyson but was left at the alter and has been in her wedding dress for every. Miss Havisham will be very weird to a modern day reader but to a Victorian reader it would be rude to think of an upper class lady like that. ...read more.

Conclusion

When pip gets to Miss Havisham house he is met by Estella at the gate, the reader will think that she's lovely and respectable but strait away she is very rude to Mr Pumblecook and keeps on calling pip a ''boy''. She is supposed to have been raised to to break men's heart. Miss Havisham and asks pip to play with Estella and she calls him a ''common labouring boy''. Havisham said ''well? You break his heart'' this makes her stand out because Dickens makes Estella very rude to men and because Havisham heart was broken by Compayson. Estella contrast Satis house because she is very pretty and lovely but Satis house is dark scary looks evil and has been closed to the out side world In this conclusion Dickens makes all of the characters memorable and striking. He uses lots of techniques he such as pathetic fallacy and red herring making Magwitch Estella and Miss Havisham memorable and striking to the modem reader and Victorian readers. ?? ?? ?? ?? Joshua Lundin 11T ...read more.

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