• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How does Priestly present the effect of the Inspectors visit on Sheila compared with the other characters in the play?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does Priestly present the effect of the Inspectors visit on Sheila compared with the other characters in the play? Sheila is deeply affected by the Inspector's visit compared to the other characters. As soon as the Inspector enters and introduces the victim to the family, Sheila was upset and depressed because of the misery she sensed which made her feel apologetic and guilty of what she had done to Eva Smith. Nonetheless the others were not interested and thought that they were not responsible for Eva's death except for Eric. Furthermore the Inspector has a mischievous attitude, with the intention of, made the rest of the family suspicious about him. Inspector Goole (as he addresses himself) is a sly and secretive individual who acts like a detective and uses his skills to make them confess the truth. The Inspector mentions society to be treated fairly and Mr Birling replies in an intolerable way, ''nonsense... ...read more.

Middle

As soon as Mr. Birling realised that Eric was the father, the revelation came, '' I don't believe it. I won't believe it ...'' Here it shows that Sheila spoken wisely for herself and for the sake of it, let her mother notice that her son isn't what she expected him to be like. So Eric feels shocked and worried as soon as he finds out that they knew he was the father when they all stare at him at the end of the Act Two and Eric says,'' You know, don't you? In this part, everyone is staring at Eric as if it was The Inspector planning that incident. Therefore the presence of The Inspector makes everyone feel disappointed and bitter when reacting towards Eric. J.B. Priestly chose to end the scene like that because it creates suspense and tension e.g. curtain falls. Dramatic irony is also a part of the play because the family and the Inspector guessed Eric was also responsible whereas Eric never knew that they realised it already. ...read more.

Conclusion

Priestley illustrates that '' no matter how rich or poor you may be, you are no different from each other and that you should help each other to make this community a better place.'' At the end of the play, the family discovered that Inspector Goole was a counterfeiter. As soon as the Inspector left the house when his interrogation came to a conclusion, the phone rang and a voice answered that a girl has committed suicide in a tragic way. This was clear to them that the Inspector was some find of spiritual life form that maybe went back to the future nevertheless the majority of the readers believe it might have been the mouthpiece of Priestley. In conclusion, the contrast between Sheila's and the family's reaction towards The Inspector is that in the beginning of the play, Sheila was deeply affected and anxious while the others handled their thoughts and response with ease and tolerance. As the story progressed, they all felt dishonour and guilt because of how The Inspector responded and used the technique to make them all confess. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Miscellaneous section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Miscellaneous essays

  1. Shylock, Victim or Villain

    Shylock using the word fangs as a metaphor for the knife going into his flesh. Fangs is also a vicious word. We understand why Shylock is acting this way as he has been called dog and spat on for years and it has built up and now he is letting

  2. The role of the Inspector in 'An Inspector Calls.'

    This proves that he does not forgive easily. Once the line of questioning turns to Gerald, the Inspector is more friendly to Sheila. He understands that she would want to hear about Gerald's affair with Eva Smith and ensures that she stays by arguing that if she left then and heard no more she would 'feel she's entirely to blame.'

  1. By what means has J.B Priestly created dramatic tension at the end of act ...

    Birling returns after looking to see who had left the house. He claims it was Eric who had left so suddenly. Mrs. Birling is alarmed by this, questioning her husband as to where he checked and hoping that he could have been mistaken.

  2. How do the dramatic techniques used in the play help the audience to understand ...

    As Shirley enters and closes the door she leans against the door and sighs, this illustrates that Shirley is not happy with her life, she is sad. In addition to this, Shirley begins to talk to the wall. She puts down her shopping and greets the wall, "hello wall".

  1. Shylock's contribution to the play and effective qualities, which are used for a dramatic ...

    Obviously the ring has a lot of sentimental value, and Shylock admires the ring, as it is a memory of Leah. He feels almost betrayed and stabbed in the back by Jessica, as she would have known how much the ring meant to him.

  2. Its my Business

    Even my best friend Michel look at me and close the door. After all I did for him and this is how he repays back. By this time it's raining hard, and I was soaking wet.

  1. Inspector Goole

    World War did take place destroying England and so many families along the way, however in the play the characters are oblivious to this as it was set in 1912 before it all happened but there was talk about it, showing a sense of dramatic irony as the audience know what is going to happen before the characters.

  2. The Trouble with the Birlings and Gerald Croft is they Confuse Respectability with Morality ...

    In fact Birling does not seem to be right about many things throughout the play. They are true social net-workers and seem to have collected all the 'right' connections, rather like you would collect stamps- they show them off at any possible time, to try and impress other shallow minded people such as themselves.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work