• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How does the community of Raveloe respond to Silas at key moments in the novel?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Document3 Silas Marner How does the community of Raveloe respond to Silas at key moments in the novel? The book, Silas Marner, written by George Eliott, was set in 1860. Therefore it is very different to what we are used to and is full of superstition and tradition. The community of Raveloe responds to Silas differently at separate key moments in the novel. The community, into which Silas entered, evolved form centuries of interdependence. The village people depend upon each other. The lower class villagers gather in the Rainbow Inn to have friendly gossip. They live in a close community and are wary of any newcomers. Most of the villagers believe in doing the right thing, so when Silas explains about his gold being stolen they agree to help, even though he has not been the friendliest of people towards them. They generally try to keep the peace, and their distance from the unexplainable unless they show signs of goodness and kindness. The village community is proven to be dependent upon each other because the writer mentions that punishment for committing a crime in a village was to be "suspended from church-membership". This meant that he was cut off from the community. When someone is cut off from all the other villagers they were lonely and had to become independent. ...read more.

Middle

They also thought of him as being a "dead man come to life again" when he went into one of his trances. They thought it was his soul leaving his body for a while. Silas's medical condition made the villagers even more wary of him; his knowledge of herbs and charms did not help either. When Silas "cured" a woman by the name of Sally Oates, from a heart condition the villagers thought it was worth "speaking fair" to him. They spoke politely to Silas to keep him from cursing them. Silas drove "one after another" of the villagers away when they asked him to cure them of their imperfections or colds. Because of this the villagers who had an accident after applying to him "set the misfortune down to Master Marner's ill-will and irritated glances". This heightened the "repulsion" between Silas and his neighbours, which made him even more, isolated than before. The village community of Raveloe responds to the robbery by helping Silas. When he appeared in the Rainbow Inn, the villagers shared the "general alarm". Silas accused Jem Rodney of the theft and was soon proven wrong when the villagers agree that Jem had been with them in the pub since before Silas left his house. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is shown when the doctor and his wife, Mrs Kimble, question his decision to keep her. He could be considered being treated like a child in a way that he would be incapable to care for Eppie himself. Like a child is unable to care for a pet all by itself. Silas, otherwise known as Master Marner, is gradually integrated into the community from this time, having spent 15 years being seen as an outsider, because the other villagers try to help him look after Eppie. Dolly lends him Aaron's baby clothes, and Godfrey helps by giving some money to Silas, for Eppie. The villagers' feelings are influenced in his favour by the fact Silas insists on keeping the child. Everyone's experience of child rearing gives him or her links with Silas, so he is welcomed into the community through Eppie. Silas begins to take part in the community by making conversation with the villagers and by taking their advice and getting Eppie christened. The village is so isolated from the rest of the World because in the 19th century very few people travelled or communicated with people outside of their community. Most people were not very well educated at this time and therefore knew little about health problems. They tried to explain things that they knew nothing about by saying it was something to do with the supernatural. Many people were superstitious and thought that this was the only reasonable explanation in the 19th century. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE George Eliot section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE George Eliot essays

  1. How is Silas Changed by his Experiences at Raveloe

    Silas accumulates the gold because when he lost his faith it was replaced with the gold; Silas now treats the gold like he once felt about God. The way in which he counts his gold every night is a routing which is new equivalent to praying, because of the fact he has nothing else in his life.

  2. Novelists in the nineteenth century believed not only in entertaining their readers, but also ...

    Dunstan approached the house and to his surprise saw that the door was not locked. He entered the house and searched it, for it was common knowledge in Raveloe that Silas Marner hoarded a great deal of gold. When Dunstan located the gold, he took it all and left, just before Silas re-entered.

  1. Which character do you believe has changed the most, in 'Silas Marner', giving reasons ...

    Eliot also mentions 'deserted' in the passage, an obvious reference to Marner's presence (or non-presence) in the village. So from that quote we are aware of Marner's appearance, that he is treated with suspicion by onlookers due to the mysterious nature of his species, and we can also assume he

  2. How does the community of Raveloe respond to Silas at key moments in the ...

    The villagers respected Godfrey; he was 'a fine open-faced, good-natured young man', who tried to convince everybody he was perfect. Dunstan, on the other hand, was quite the opposite. He was known to 'like his drink' and not to be as respectable as Godfrey.

  1. Consider how the character of Silas Marner has changed though out the novel

    to help them so he tells them to go away, this makes them dislike Marner even more. In spite of his isolation and rejection of others, Silas has the capacity to love, this is shown when he accidentally breaks his favourite pot, "the brown pot could never be of any

  2. "The great virtue of this novel is the portrayal of the community in Raveloe." ...

    He also believed that children where the most precious thing you could have and children could help heal the past. This is exactly why Eliot used Eppie in Silas Marner- so Eppie could help heal Silas's past. It also made Silas realize that love is much greater than any amount

  1. They do the Poet in Different Voices

    if I had ploughed on with my increasingly uninspired treatment of the poetry. Indeed this ending rather more reflects Eliot's running away from his wife in 1933 when he went to America, but never came back to her. There are parallels in the setting of this play and 'The Marat/Sade' by Peter Weiss, but no direct references.

  2. Trace the character of Silas Marner throughout the novel and explain the ideas that ...

    His chance soon comes. Soon, the town's senior Deacon became dangerously ill. The town's people, including Silas, took it in turns to watch the dying man day and night. One night as Silas is waiting for Dane to come and take over he enters one of his fits.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work