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How does Wilfred Owen show the full horror of war in his poem “Dulce et decorum est”?

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Introduction

How does Wilfred Owen show the full horror of war in his poem "Dulce et decorum est"? "Dulce et decorum est" is a poem about how unpleasant and horrifying the First World War was. The title, which is Latin for "it is sweet and right to die for your country" has a meaning, which is opposite to that of the poem. The poem is primarily about the soldiers at war and the conditions that they suffered. ...read more.

Middle

coughing like hags..." The effect that the language has upon the reader is biased, it makes you realise that the war was bad, not good. In stanza 2 Wilfred Owen shows the horror of war by using exclamation marks (!) this creates the impression of shouting "Gas, Gas, quick boys !" this shows who ever is saying it is warning them that a gas bomb is approaching and for them to put on their gas masks, this is where Wilfred Owen uses "...as an ecstasy fumbling, fitting the clumsy helmets..." ...read more.

Conclusion

In stanza 3 Wilfred Owen only uses two lines "In all my dreams before my helpless sight he plunged at me, guttering, choking, drowning." This tells us that the sights that some people were seeing were sickening. This emphasizes the horror of war as a sickening, terrible place to be. In stanza 4 Wilfred Owen uses very strong words to describe the way a soldier is dying. He uses "...blood came gargling from the froth corrupt lungs..." this string of words was used to make the reader feel sympathy for the soldier and to let the reader know that that is what many other soldiers had to suffer and that war was not a good thing. ...read more.

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