• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How The Poems I Am Very Bothered and Poem Compare

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How Does Simon Armitage Bring Characters to Life in His Poetry? In "I am very bothered" and "Poem" Simon Armitage brings his characters to life by describing the mood and tone. He also structures both poems well and uses rhyme and rhythm to keep it interesting and to emphasise the point of his poems, especially in "I am very bothered". In both poems the number of lines per verse decreases. This means the later verses have all the information compacted into less sentences. This makes the last verse more interesting and allows the poem to end on a high note. At first glance it seems that neither poems have much structure. This is true for "I am very bothered" but not for "Poem". ...read more.

Middle

This makes the poem seem judgemental. The last verse is written in the past tense, making the poem seem slightly morbid, "Here's how they rated him when they looked back: sometimes he did this, sometimes he did that. " This makes it seem like the man in the poem is dead and the poem is being recited at his funeral. In "I am very bothered" Armitage uses iconic love poem language to set the mood for a love poem, "naked lilac flame", "O the unrivalled". After thinking it will end nicely he uses language to make the boy seem slightly psychopathic, "O the unrivalled stench of branded skin". ...read more.

Conclusion

There are also other signs of this. For example, "two burning rings" could symbolise the real rings used in marriages and "for eternity" is suggesting that the marks are everlasting, just like the bond of marriage. Another sign the boy is in love with the girl is the way he describes the bunsen's flame. "Naked lilac flame" makes it seem romantic when you could describe it as just an orange flame. In conclusion, Simon Armitage makes his characters come to life by using a verity of poetic techniques that relate to what the themes of the poems are. He creates images in our heads of the situations they are in and describes their feelings to tell us what they are thinking. Liam Queally 9 Thorne ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Miscellaneous section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Miscellaneous essays

  1. War Poems

    He is trying to say here that there was so much blood on some of their feet, that it acted like a shoe to some of the soldiers that had already lost their boots. 'All went lame, all blind; Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots'.

  2. Songs of Innocence and Song of Experience appears to be very simplistic on first ...

    People see the sinister side of the world; therefore Blake would have seen ignorance as bliss. The next poems I will be analysing are The Chimney sweeper from Songs of innocence and The Chimney sweeper from Songs of Experience. The Songs of innocence version was written in 1789.

  1. Poetry coursework- Simon Armitage explore how both men are presented in Simon Amitages poem(TM) ...

    In 'Poem' we see a man doing good deeds but then being put down by the bad deeds he had devoted. This poem comes across as though he is being remembered, like at his funeral or a memorial service. It is read as if a close friend or relative was

  2. William Blake Poems

    Some children that were not put into the trade of chimney sweeping then they would instead be educated (if their parents possessed the money) and if not the children were sent to Charity schools. These were schools that were established by mainly religious organisations and were used to educate children until they could be put into a trade.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work