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"Jellicoe threw away a great chance to Win a decisive victory at Jutland".

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Introduction

"Jellicoe threw away a great chance to Win a decisive victory at Jutland" Both naval fleets had never experienced a "Battle at Sea" before in the war. The Battle of Jutland would be the only sea campaign that they would encounter. Both fleet commanders, Admiral Jellicoe of the British Grand Fleet and Vice Admiral Scheer of Germanys High Seas Fleet both had a plan to lure one another into a trap. Using a small number of ships to act as 'bait'. However neither commander realised the opposing side had most of their fleets close by. On 31st May 1916 forty German Ships, commanded by Hipper encountered 52 British vessels, commanded by Admiral Beatty. Each fleet was led by their battle cruisers, which were very powerful. ...read more.

Middle

Whereas the German ships on the other hand were fitted with anti-blast doors in the shaft. So if an enemy shell hit a gun turret the magazine was protected from the blast and did not explode. Soon the rest of the fleets joined together. Jellicoe and Scheer arrived on the scene. 250 ships of the Grand Fleet faced 150 ships of the German High Sea's Fleet. Jellicoe had the upper- hand in numbers and also in position. His line of ships came at right angles to the German ships. In naval terms this is referred to a 'crossing the T'. The British fleet could fire guns at the Germans as they passed at right angles to their ships. ...read more.

Conclusion

Only 2500 German sailors died whereas the British lost 6000. Germany never returned to the fighting at sea. Instead she stayed safely inside her harbour at Kiel for the remainder of the war. This meant that the Grand Fleet dominated the seas and could blockade Germanys supplies. Jellicoe in some ways did throw away a chance for victory at Jutland by not advancing on the Germans further. In the end however I think it was a better victory this way. Even though Britain couldn't say that they had officially triumphed at Jutland. Yet in the long run they had control of the seas. If they had engaged the German fleet again they would have suffered heavier losses to their Fleet. Who knows that maybe the Germans would have resorted to torpedoes, as Jellicoe had feared. Britain won in reality. Even though they did suffer heavier losses. They won the sea. ...read more.

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